Knitting question - pattern stitch


I am working on some slippers for Christmas presents and can across somthing
I'm unfamiliar with. The cuff of the slipper can be worked in either garter
stitch, seed stitch or moss stitch. I've never seen moss stitch, and I
would like to try it. Does anyone know how that is done?
Thanks.
-ned
Reply to
Nanci E Donacki
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Hi, Nanci! Well, therein lies confusion. In the US, seed/moss is sometimes an interchangeable term! But! Sometimes it's NOT! :D In *my* experience, moss stitch is TWO knits, TWO purls, with the reverse on the second row. Am quite sure someone else will have another "take" on moss stitch, so wait for more replies! HTH, Noreen
Reply to
The YARNWRIGHT
AFAIK, seed stitch and moss stitch look alike to the observer, with the difference being that seed stitch is worked on an even number of stitches, and moss stitch is worked on an odd number. EX: Seed stitch: Make sure you have an even number of stitches. Row 1: *k1, p1. Repeat from * across row. Row 2: *p1, k1. Repeat from * across row.
Moss stitch: Make sure you have an odd number of stitches. Every row: *k1, p1. Repeat from * across row.
Maybe someone else knows something different, but this is what I have always done.
HTH Katherine
Reply to
Katherine
Thanks everyone! I want to make the cuffs a bit different on each size that I'm making so I can easily tell them apart. With all my left over yarn, I can get at least 8 pairs of these done! Thanks again. I knew this would be the best place to get the answer quickly and easily. -ned
Reply to
Nanci E Donacki
----- Original Message ----- From: "Nanci E Donacki" Newsgroups: rec.crafts.textiles.yarn Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2005 8:20 AM Subject: Re: Knitting question - pattern stitch
Another varation for you to use would be double seed stitch. Row 1- K1,P1 Row 2- Work even Row 3-P1,K1 Row 4- Work even
Repeat Rows 1-4
Historical note, seed stitch was also known as cat's teeth in the early Aran patterns and is refered to as such in Gladys Thompson's book on Aran knitting. DA
Reply to
DA
On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 06:55:42 -0600, "The YARNWRIGHT" spewed forth :
stitch, so wait
Seed stitch or moss stitch:
R1: k1, p1 across R2: p1, k1 across
IOW, knit the purls and purl the knits
Double moss stitch:
R1/2: k1, p1 across R3/4: p1, k1 across
YMMV based on your source :D Endless variations on a theme
Wool "There's just one stitch in knitting!" Grrl
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Reply to
Wooly
fWooly maybe you add if your pattern is in the round or both sides of the work mirjam
stitch, so wait >>for more replies! >>HTH, >>Noreen > >Seed stitch or moss stitch: > >R1: k1, p1 across >R2: p1, k1 across > >IOW, knit the purls and purl the knits > >Double moss stitch: > >R1/2: k1, p1 across >R3/4: p1, k1 across > > >YMMV based on your source :D Endless variations on a theme > >Wool "There's just one stitch in knitting!" Grrl > >+++++++++++++ > >Reply to the list as I do not publish an email address to USENET. >This practice has cut my spam by more than 95%. >Of course, I did have to abandon a perfectly good email account...
Reply to
Mirjam Bruck-Cohen
formatting link
,
The url above will explain the moss stitch very simply. It is not a complicated stitch and is very attractive.
Hope this is your answer.
Hugs & God bless,
Dennis & Gail
Reply to
Spike Driver
I finished one pair using the basic seed/moss stitch and that came out quite nicely. I'm now try the double that Noreen suggested, and that looks nice as well. Different from the first one. And then I'll try the one that DA suggested. I'm going to add all of these to my stitch notebook, since they should make some nice edges on sweaters or mittens as well. Thanks again everyone. -ned
Reply to
Nanci E Donacki
I love the rice stich as edge , it is very handy to knit on one piece no seams clothes ,,, I have a hint to share .....on Since on long edges make some short 'rows of rice ' , on the frontal edge of vests and sweaters,,,,, i.e, rice you edge , turn , rice back , turn rice rest of row , come to other side rice the edge , turn rice the edge turn rice m turn back to making the whole row ,,, mirjam
Reply to
Mirjam Bruck-Cohen
On Sat, 19 Nov 2005 20:05:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@actcom.co.il (Mirjam Bruck-Cohen) spewed forth :
Good point - I don't knit anything flat if I can knit it in the round :)
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Reply to
Wooly
In article ,
Is that in the first edition? I've been looking through that book and I can't find the reference.
=Tamar
Reply to
Richard Eney

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