Self-congratulations


My task for this morning was to mend two gray sweaters knit of shetland
wool. I have mended so many moth holes or wear holes (where I roll up the
cuff) in one that it almost didn't matter what I did, but, with the right
yarn, a kitchener stitch fix worked fine. THe real challenge was a break at
the bind-off at the hip (I knit top-down) on my Monet picture sweater--right
in the middle in the front. It looked bad, and I was afraid of it
unravelling. I looked at it and realized what I needed to do was to
crochet-embroider a 2-inch area surrounding the break, and although I've
never managed to crochet anything before, beyond chains to hold mittens
together, it was obvious looking at this with crochet hook in hand what I
needed to do. Since I had some of the original yarn, the fix is virtually
invisible. Yeah, I feel smug!
Georgia
Reply to
Georgia
I think it's still just single crochet (though I could easily be wrong about that), but I do feel empowered. I think it's a little funny that it took me, well, let's just say "over 30 years" to figure it out!
Georgia
Reply to
Georgia
Hi Georgia,
That's ok, I was 26 before I learned to crochet, then I put it aside for knitting for another 20 or more, but do it all the time now.
Hugs,
Nora
Reply to
norabalcer
Goodness, Georgia , you have a right to feel very smug indeed - Good work God Bless gwen
Reply to
Gwen
On Sun, 19 Feb 2006 17:01:44 GMT, "Georgia" wrote:
Great job!
My husband has a nice sweater knit by his first wife, who died over 15 years ago. This sweater was becoming very worn at the cuffs and the elbows, but he wouldn't ever want to get rid of it. I rescued it by putting suede patches at the elbows and working a row of single crochet in matching yarn around the cuffs. The hard part was to make sure it was neither too tight nor too loose. I made sure to catch each stitch with my crochet hook so that it won't unravel. Now the sweater looks good for another 20 years.
Reply to
B Vaugha
Aww, that is very nice! I hate to see a favorite sweater being thrown away when it could have been rescued. I bet he was very pleased that you saved the sweater for him. :o)
Gemini
Reply to
MRH
On Sun, 19 Feb 2006 17:01:44 GMT, "Georgia" wrote:
If that didn't work, I'd think about unraveling the long sleeves into short sleeves, and then you are bound to be beyond the holed area, and it also gives you plenty of yarn to redo ribbing for the sleeves and still have a lot left over to mend other areas of the sweater.
Congratulations! I looked at your lovely sweaters online, and I'm glad you were able to repair them. As for crocheting, there are so many creative techniques out there for making stitches, I don't consider anything done with a crochet hook and yarn to be a "wrong" method. I invented a technique with hook and yarn to crochet an afghan together that I designed and didn't want to sew. So, I pulled out my hook and used it in what some would consider an unconventional manner just because it hasn't been mentioned being done somewhere else.
Leah
Reply to
Leah
Thanks, eveeryone. I think I'm going to have to get a whole passel of crochet hooks, so I have one with each project, for dropped stitches, etc.
Hmm, I never thought of unravelling the sleeves and re-doing the cuffs--they are too long anyway (that's why I roll them back). But it is a commercial machine knit, at a very fine gauge--not sure I could knit cuffs for it in gauge even with my 0000 needles (which I don't actually use for knitting), or if the unravelled yarn would be knittable after so many years. Interesting project to think about...
Georgia
sweater--right
Reply to
Georgia

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