OT word of the day - Page 7

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Re: A glitzy velvet quilt was: word of the day
What would you like in trade? e me
Butterfly   -  Wings    at   cox   dot   net

Butterfly (Might just get it done by next Christmas)

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Re: A glitzy velvet quilt was: word of the day
Oh, that one sounds very drool worthy! I am trying to picture this ....So,
are the blocks basically light colored crazy blocks with dark fans appliquéd
over. or are the crazy blocks alternate to the fan blocks?

I've got a big container of fancy fabric ... I really should sort it and
start a crazy quilt of some sort. I'd like to do one with lots of
embroidery.

A really fantastic CQ is the one in the Palace in Honolulu. IT was made by
the Queen of Hawaii when she was imprisoned. I saw it about 12 years ago. It
was displayed carefully in a Plexiglas box. I have a set of slides I got at
the museum shop ... wonder where those are.
Later,
PAT in VA/USA

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Re: A glitzy velvet quilt was: word of the day
I don't believe it was done in blocks.
I have at least seen no sign of it.  There are a few longish seams,
6-7 inches maybe, but I've not seen a right angle ever.  Believe me
I've looked!   Either the whole of it was done as a single crazy
block, or the maker was very clever with her seaming.  I believe the
fans are appliqued on.  At first glance they are pretty random, but
when you can look at the whole they are tumbling in concentric
oblongs.  The fans are light colors, with a couple of colors that may
have originally been midtones. Now the fans appear to be white, very
pale pink, various beiges, and an odd grey-green  The crazy pieces are
darks, all you see now are browns, very dark maroons, and blacks.
Whatever they dyed the velvet with has not stood the test of time
especially well.  The beiges in the fans make me suspect anilines,
they often fade to assorted shades of beige, or turn brown in darks.
However it is possible that madder was used extensively also, or
instead.  Madder also turns brown with time.  The colors in the
embroidery have held up better than in the fabric, the embroidery is
mostly golden yellow with touches of red and white here and there.
Mostly simple stitches over the seams, cross stitch, herringbone, etc.
except for the occasional worked flower.  Also around the fans the
seamstress allowed herself to get a bit fancier. You see some bouillan
patterns, french knots, and lace style buttonholing around the fans.
From what I can tell from what I have seen of the back, she used the
flowers and perhaps some of the stiches near the fans to tack the
quilt, instead of disrupting her patterns with ties.

For all that the colors have not worn well it is still lovely.

NightMist
  
On Fri, 2 Jan 2009 22:57:15 -0500, "Pat in Virginia"

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--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: A glitzy velvet quilt was: word of the day
I started with collecting a yard of real velvet in the deep tones when I
worked at the Fabric Store. Then it just grew. I have some black with gold
beaded butterflies, some that look like flowers, some that is multi-colored
velvet....and ....... some that is still a yard or two uncut.
Oh dear, it's been a long time since I touched it. I _ DO_ know exactly
where it is.

BEG/Trade/swap?
if any of you have velvet scraps must be no smaller than 6" square ...I
wouldn't mind your sending a bit my way.
This year I hope to finish a few tops that are cut out and ready to be sewn
now that I can sit a bit longer. Not a resolution..just a hope

Butterfly (Have been having a blast watching the Looney Tunes Cartoon
marathon whilst KNITTING a bit.and doing catch-up laundry from a 3 day
business trip )



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Re: OT word of the day

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I still have my tailor's ham, too, Patti! I used to follow the very good
instructions in the Vogue Sewing book, and the ham was quite helpful. Of
course, I don't make my clothes at all any longer, so I don't quite know
why I hang onto that ham, but I do. <G>

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--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sw.foster1 (at) gmail (dot) com (remove/change the obvious)
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Re: OT word of the day
I just think:  well I might need it again some day >g<.
If I didn't think that so often, of course, I would not have accumulated
so much 'stuff'!!
Sometimes I get a 'ruthless throw away inclination'.  So I start.  Then
I start encountering all the 'sentimental value only things'.  Then it
all becomes a fruitless task - I know I'm never going to willingly throw
them away!
.
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Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
My mother had a tailor's ham. Think my little sister got it, along
with her darning egg. I got the rest of her sewing box.

Ginger in CA

On Dec 31 2008, 10:27=A0pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist) wrote:
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Re: OT word of the day
Ooh!  that reminds me, too.  I have a darning mushroom >g<
This is a fun thread >g<
.
In message
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Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: OT word of the day
Pat,
I just checked my basket of darners. I have a darning mushroom, and an egg
on a handle. I have two eggs without handles. The latter three darners are
quite old ... vintage I guess. One wooded egg is made of both light and dark
wood and is very intricate in appearance. I do not know the name of this
technique, but I think the egg is from Wales. From the small end, it has a
checkerboard appearance. The curved sides are very pretty. Maybe John will
know. By the way, the handles on darners are convenient for darning fingers
of gloves! Yes, a fun topic.

PAT in VA/USA

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Re: OT word of the day
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Three of them in this house.  Marion uses them quite often.
All from charity shops or car boot sales, and I don't think
any of the people selling them knew what they were for.

==== j a c k  at  c a m p i n . m e . u k  ===  <http://www.campin.me.uk ====
Jack Campin, 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland == mob 07800 739 557
CD-ROMs and free stuff:  Scottish music, food intolerance, and Mac logic fonts

Re: OT word of the day

Since it got some mention, and I know that some people don't know what
it is...

Darning Egg

An egg, ball, or similarly shaped tool used to keep the tension and
weave or knit of already worked fabric even while further working on
it.

By its name it is obvious that it is commonly used for darning.
It is also used to keep the knitting stitches even when finishing
certain knitting projects, like the toes of socks or the ends of
mittens.  It is useful when embellishing finished or premade portions
of clothing items.  For example, when adding embroidery to the little
puffed sleeves so frequently found on infantwear it is invaluable.

Darning eggs can be found, both modern and antique, made of a wide
range of materials.  They may or may not have handles.  While the
stone or porcelain ones can be very pretty, the wooden ones are
generally easiest to use. The wooden ones are not so heavy, and have
enough texture to not be slippery against the fabric.  
Alternatives to the egg are the darning mushroom, which always has a
handle in imitation of the stalk, and any number of smooth gourds.

One occasionally finds the false eggs placed under hens to try and
encourage them to sit sold as darning eggs.  These eggs come in a
variety of sizes according to the breed of chicken they are intended
for, all of which are usually smaller than the average darning egg.
The materials are often much the same, though sometimes colored to try
and imitate real eggs.  The size differences can make them useful for
working on children's and baby clothes.

In a pinch almost any smooth, hard object of suitable size and shape
will do the job.  
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
I have 2 eggs and one mushroom, and I actually use them to darn socks!
Roberta in D

On Fri, 02 Jan 2009 16:15:26 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (NightMist)
wrote:

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Re: OT word of the day
Oh dear, I'm not hungry, but I sure expected you to say and I make them into
omelets.

Butterfly (Thanks for the LOL)
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Re: OT word of the day
Rather sew than cook any day! Even mending.
Roberta in D

On Fri, 2 Jan 2009 13:25:10 -0700, "Butterflywings"

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Re: OT word of the day
My mother often used a dried gourd for darning socks, though sometimes
she used a burned out light bulb. She never had a real darning egg.

Julia in MN

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Re: OT word of the day
Sewing Cushion  
Sewing Bird

Women have been pinning or clipping the work to their knee so as to
hold a fair bit of the seam straight to be worked on for centuries.
This practice was especially common when sewing large items like
skirts or sheets.
At some point in the eighteenth century the practice became looked
down upon as "common".  However it was so practical that many women
just didn't care.  At some point prior to that the idea of using a
fancy cushion with a fairly heavy weight in the bottom that could be
set on the edge of a table, and have the work pinned to it instead of
to the seamstress knee came about. As books gradually became more
important, and books and periodicals on housekeeping and sewing became
more common, admonishments from authors against the practice of
pinning work to your knee were not infrequently seen. It would
variously mark you as a low sort of woman, or destroy your health,
depending on the author.  Instructions for the construction of sewing
cushions began to be published.  Some number of cushions were
marketed, many of which included things like pockets to put things in,
fringes of beadwork around the bottom, carved platforms upon which the
cushion sat, and sometimes a clamp arrangement that would allow the
cushion to be clamped to the table rather than having to depend upon
it being weighted.  The idea of a clamp arrangement instead of a
cushion appealed to some inventors, and a number of completely
unsatisfactory clamping arrangements were marketed. None of them
allowed the work to be repositioned quickly.  Then  somebody
remembered the sewing bird.
There are records of sewing birds as far back as the 17th century, but
the were expensive and didn't really come into fashion until the late
Georgian period.  They allowed the fabric to be repostioned in the
clamp with reasonable ease and speed.  However they were still
expensive, so cushions ruled.  To this day sewing birds tend to be
pricy enough that they are more regarded as a novelty than a tool,
though in the mid to late 19th century they were moderately common.
The sort of thing a professional seamstress or well to do housewife
might own.
Of course once sewing cushions and birds began to be _sold_ the whole
topic took on a new slant.  Not only would pinning the work to your
knee destroy your health and mark you as an outcast in society, but
_not_ pinning the work to your knee would as well.  The work had to be
pinned to a cushion or held by a bird. Charles Atlas probably read his
mother's old sewing periodicals, for some of the ads for birds or
cushions were accompanied by engravings of the bright and chipper
woman with good posture sewing with a cushion or a bird, accompanied
by a picture of the slattern with the work pinned to her knee, or the
poor broken backed frail woman hunched over her unpinned work.

An explanation of how a bird works, with a note on the first one
patented in America at:

http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/object.cfm?key=35&objkey=74
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Sewing Bird Re: OT word of the day
While I do not own a sewing bird, I have employed my SM in similar fashion.
It can work as a 'third hand' when I need to unstitch a seam. I just place
the offending bit of fabric under the pressure foot, and hold the cloth taut
while I wield my seam ripper. I bet most of you have done the same.
Barbara, I don't always have time to read all the posts,  but when I come
across one of your 'wotd' posts, I always learn something new! Thanks.

PAT in VA/USA

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. At some point prior to that the idea of using a
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Re: OT word of the day

Batiste

A fine plain weave fabric.

After that much the sources begin to disagree.

It is apparently made of everything, used for any fine clothing and
originally was created in at least four different countries.  It is a
finer version of muslin, cambric, lawn, dimity, and voile.  It was
invented by a man named Baptiste, it was invented at a convent, it was
commissioned to be made by a mistress of the king of France, and it
was invented by English weavers to give the local lacemakers a leg up
on the Belgians and the French.
With this kind of history it is obvious that a good many people think
highly of the stuff.  It is also obvious that it's history is so
muddled as to be nearly impossible to disentangle.  And it is
difficult to know what anyone means when they use the name, unless you
have already come to agreement on a definition.

When I say it, I mean a fine gauzey fabric made of cotton or a
cotton-linen blend, that is suitable for a narrow scope of clothing.
Mostly costumes, lingerie, special occasion infant's or children's
clothes, and parts of blouses or dresses.  It is usually too fine to
be able to stand on its own unless it is layered or lined.  That does
make it useful for some embroidered laces, certain religious garb, and
assorted work of that nature.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

Re: OT word of the day
My most typical use of batiste is for a soft underlining in a garment
that I want to have just a bit of extra body. For example, I used it in
the tops of the satin dresses I sewed for DD's wedding; they were also
lined with a light-weight poly lining.

Julia in MN

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Re: OT word of the day

button gimp
buttonhole gimp

Button gimp is just a thin heavy cord used to reinforce buttonholes.
It can be used in either overstitched or welt style buttonholes.  It
adds a bit of stiffness to them, and can help prevent them tearing
out. It is simply basted down to where the edges of the button hole
will be, and then stitched over for overstitched holes. For welted
holes it is more permanently stitched down after the welting fabric is
basted or pinned in place.  Then the welting fabric is just turned
over the gimp and stitched next to it after the hole is cut and the
welting pulled through.
--  

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.

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