End grain sealer

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
I got a gallon of end grain sealer some time back, and it seems to have  
caked in the bottle.  It's in a one gallon plastic jug, sort of like a  
milk jug.  I've never had it set up on me in a closed container before.  
  Does anyone know if there's a way to redissolve it?  It's between half  
and three quarters of the bottle, so I hate to waste it.

It's not solid - there is still some liquid in it but there are large  
hunks of solidified wax too.

The lid has been screwed on the bottle - it's not like it was in a can  
exposed to air.

Thanks...

...Kevin
--  
Kevin Miller - http://www.alaska.net/~atftb
Juneau, Alaska
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
On 5/19/2011 6:27 PM, Kevin Miller wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

if it were mine, I'd get one of those paint mixer things that goes on a  
hand drill and mix it back up real well

--  
www.wbnoble.com

Re: End grain sealer
On 05/19/2011 09:09 PM, Bill Noble wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Hmmm, that's a thought.  I don't have one of those - wonder if my wife  
would mind if I used the Kitchen-Aid mixer? :-)

...Kevin
--  
Kevin Miller - http://www.alaska.net/~atftb
Juneau, Alaska
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
Kevin Miller wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

No, she will applaud your enterprising spirit.  

At least my mom did when my dad used the spray painter on her vacuum cleaner  
to paint a one of those old kitchen cabinets that had the 25lb flour bin and  
the pull out procelain work areas - in the kitchen.  From what I understand,  
the prints of her fingers and toes were still in the ceiling when they moved  
out of that apartment.  :-)

Re: End grain sealer
On 5/20/2011 8:46 AM, Kevin Miller wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

if you insist on using kitchen tools, I'd recommend a blender, not a  
mixer.  If you prefer domestic harmony, spending $3 on a paint mixer to  
go in your drill will be money well spent.  If you don't have $3, find  
it in a thrift store for 25 cents

--  
www.wbnoble.com

Re: End grain sealer

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Take it to a paint store and ask them to shake your booty...

Re: End grain sealer
On 5/19/2011 9:27 PM, Kevin Miller wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If it were me, I'd try some lacquer thinner, which will dissolve wax  
with no problem.  Also, if you have an old iron, see if that melts the  
stuff, which sounds like wax.  I've used regular paraffin wax with an  
old iron to melt the wax right into the end grain, and that works great.

--  
Jack
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
On 06/01/2011 03:54 AM, Jack Stein wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

End grain sealer is a water based solution, so I don't think the lacquer  
thinner would work too well.  I'm going to give the paint stirrer method  
a go as soon as I can find an empty paint can.  the sealer is in a  
plastic jug w/about a one inch opening at the top, so to get the wax &  
such out I'll probably have to destroy the container.

Thanks though..

--  
Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If the product is Anchorseal by U. C. Coatings give them a call.
They're located and Buffalo, NY.  I picked up a 5 gallon pail at their
plant a few years ago and they gave me the grand tour of their
facilities.  Great people.


http://www.uccoatings.com/
Customer Service Representative, please call 1-888-END-COAT (363-2628)
between the hours of 8:00am - 4:30pm EST.  
--  
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA

Re: End grain sealer
On 06/01/2011 12:28 PM, Nova wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's a thought.  I don't know if it's Anchorseal or not.  It isn't  
branded as such (Woodcrafter's or something like that).  I've always  
thought that no matter the brand it was probably Anchorseal.  Sort of  
like green beans in the supermarket - all the brands probably came from  
the same cannery, just w/different labels...

...Kevin
--  
Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
Kevin Miller wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

They may make them all, but all are not the same.  I bought a jug from  
Woodcraft and it was definitely different from that sold by Packard.  
More runny and drippy.

--  
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA

We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
On 6/1/2011 3:57 PM, Kevin Miller wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If it is water based then I'd try water to redissolve it?  If all the  
liquid was gone, I'd still try Lacquer thinner. I wouldn't think wax  
would dissolve in water, more of an emulsion I guess.  Once the water is  
gone, you have wax?  The reason wax works as a grain sealer is moisture  
doesn't penetrate wax. That's why I like plain old (paraffin/ candle)  
wax melted into the end grain with an (old) iron.

I'm going to give the paint stirrer method
Quoted text here. Click to load it

What did you end up doing and how did it work?  Was the product an  
Anchorseal product?

--  
Jack
Two fish swim into a concrete wall. One turns to the other and  says 'Dam!'
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
On 06/11/2011 08:33 AM, Jack Stein wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

There was still some liquid in it, so I did add some water to see if it  
would redissolve.  Not really sure if it helped or not.  Once it's dry  
on a log though, the rain doesn't bother it, so after some point it may  
be too far gone.  It may redissolve when I stir it.  Or at least create  
a suspension that I can paint on.  We'll see.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Don't know if it was actually an Anchorseal product or not.  Doesn't say  
on the bottle.  I have another can of end grain sealer which I've been  
using so it's one of my back-burner projects at the moment.  When I get  
low I'll have to track down a metal paint can.  Or use the one my good  
end grain sealer is in when it's empty.

I'll post the results when I get to it...


...Kevin
--  
Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
On 6/13/2011 1:38 PM, Kevin Miller wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Find yourself an old electric iron.  Works really really well.

When I was young I used to snow ski, and I'd wax my skis with an old  
steam iron.  One day I was using the lathe on some green firewood and  
making lamp blanks and wanted to seal them to stop the cracks sure to  
come when drying.  Light went on and I had some old paraffin wax laying  
around and wow, did that work great for sealing end grain.

I have a lot of old firewood I turned into high quality hardwood billets  
with almost no cracking using this method.

--  
Jack
You Can't Fix Stupid, but You Can Vote it Out!
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: End grain sealer
On 06/15/2011 07:08 AM, Jack Stein wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah, I've heard of folks doing that.  But end grain sealer is less  
fiddly (at least for me - YMMV).  Nothing to plug in - just slather on a  
coat and let 'er dry.

Like I mentioned in an earlier post, I have a gallon of sealer that's  
fine.  I'm just trying to salvage the half gallon or so of sealer in  
another jar that set up on me.  If it works great.  If not, no biggie.

Appreciate the suggestion though...

--  
Kevin Miller
Juneau, Alaska
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.

Site Timeline