Bread dough never gets "smooth and silky" after needing

I have been making bread 2-3 times a week for about a month, and no matter how long I knead the dough (tried for 30 minutes last night) it never becomes smooth and silky. It did not bother me until just recently because the dough DOES become smooth and silky after the first rise when it gets punched down. But I was making noodles (or trying to) and the directions said to knead the heck out of the dough. It said to knead it until it is smooth and silky, and then 10 minutes more. I used all purpose flour for this, and it did become smooth. Bread flour has more gluten so it should come together better than AP flour, right?
Any ideas on how to go from lumpy and torn to smooth and silky?
Thanks! Paul
Reply to
Paul
wrote:
Hi Paul,
The thing that you are leaving out of the equation is time...
I would suggest that you try this:
Mix up some dough, but mix it only to the point that you are certain that you have left no pockets of dry flour.
Then, put the dough in the refrigerator for a few hours.
Finally, take it out and knead it.
Also, you mention bread flour by saying:
"Bread flour has more gluten so it should come together better than AP flour, right?"
but the answer is "No."
Higher gluten flours (often called "bread flour") is slower to fully hydrate, and also needs more water to bring it to a particular texture.
Because it hydrates more slowly than would lower protein flour, it will take longer to form a smooth dough.
All the best,
Reply to
Kenneth

I have no doubt that this would work because the dough does get smooth after rising for an hour. Is this a quirk of my enviroment, flour or recipe; or should I be doing this every time I make any bread? If it is a moisture absorbtion issue, could it be that it is because I live in an extremely dry area (phoenix)?
Thanks!
Paul
Reply to
Paul
wrote:
Hi Paul,
I don't know with certainty, but it would seem possible that your flour, stored in such a dry environment, takes longer to fully hydrate than it might in a more humid area.
But, whatever the cause, you are likely to get better results by just slowing it all down.
All the best,
Reply to
Kenneth

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