pie crust w/liquid fat

can anyone share their experiences making pie crust with liquid
shortening and/or butter?
better worse, the same?
Reply to
Fritz
I would say....awful....It lacks flakiness and the texture is not short... or tough eating .In addition when baked the dough shrinks more....browns more....with a distinct oiliness ....looking like a fried biscuit ...
Reply to
Roy
Flakiness in pastry comes from surrounding particles of fat with a "paste" or dough. Using liquid shortening will give you a very fragile crust that is not flaky. Also, oils don't usually have much flavor, unless you use olive oil.
The only reason that I see consistently given for using oil is in relation to technique. That is, people who haven't mastered cutting fat into the flour often find that using oil is easier. They always tell you that the pastry is very tender, which it is. It isn't flaky however.
I find the best results come from a combination of butter and solid shortening. This gives a very flavorful crust that flaky, tender, and easy to handle.
Reply to
Vox Humana
BTW,,, what I mean here is using the liquified fat( regardless if its butter or shortening)
Reply to
Roy
that's what I've been using. But just a couple tbspns butter per crust. what have you found is a good ratio?
Reply to
Fritz
I like to use 6 oz butter and 2 oz. shortening for 2 cups of flour. If it is very hot outside, I might use 4 oz butter and 4 oz shortening. The flour is a blend of 1.5 cups AP and 0.5 cups cake. I use about 1/2 tsp salt (and 2 tablespoons of sugar if it is desert pastry) along with enough water to make a dough. I use the butter directly from the freezer and make the pastry in my food processor.
Reply to
Vox Humana

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