to frog or not to frog


that is the question . . .
Putting it another way: when do you live with what you know is wrong or decide
to do it over even though your 'mistakes' aren't that horrendous?
Reply to
anne
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My mother taught me "the man on a galloping horse" rule. If a man riding by on a galloping horse wouldn't know the difference, I shouldn't let it bother me. That said, I tend to fix things that are readily apparent and leave things that aren't.
I'm currently knitting a terribly complex Kaffee Fasset sweater and I goofed and made the top of a blue diamond the purple that is next to it. Fixing the problem would have involved ripping out 3 rows of intarsia and fair isle knitting (even dropping down just those stitches would have been complex) and it's at the waistband of the back of the sweater.
I'm gonna live with it.
Elizabeth
Reply to
Dr. Brat
Depends on the purpose of the piece and the severity of the mistake. If it's going to make everything wonky, I'll redo it. If it's a gift or something else I'm taking special care with, I'm more likely to redo it. If it's nothing particularly special, I probably wouldn't fix it unless it really bugged me.
Best wishes, Ericka
Reply to
Ericka Kammerer
I nearly always frog but that's because I'm a recovering perfectionholic. I try to get over it, but I keep having relapses.
Does anyone know of a good perfectionistic rehab center for retired needleworkers?
Lucille
Reply to
Lucille
Depends how obvious the mistake will be to the recipient.
A wise woman told me she would only frog if she'd written Merry Chismas or given someone a blue face. The recipient would never know those flowers were supposed to be pink instead of yellow.
If it's going on my wall, there are some errors that I'll fix because I know they'll drive me crazy, even if I'd let them go on someone else's.
Reply to
Karen C in California
It depends. If at some point I can catch up to the chart I will overlook it. If there is no end in sight and it throws off the whole of it, I frog. I just had to do that with a very large area on "Eye of the Tiger."
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have to cut and paste. Does anyone know how to make a tiny URL? I see it used, but have no idea how to use it myself.
Reply to
Jangchub
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Here's the one I use.
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I just copy the URL on the from line, paste it into the tiny url space and it shortens it and puts it on your clipboard.
You then can use that anyplace you want by pasting it.
Lucille
Reply to
Lucille
On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 22:45:07 -0400, "Dr. Brat" wrote:
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LOVE THAT!
thanks, V
Reply to
Jangchub
I have never tried any of Kaffee Fasset`s patterns, but i enjoyed looking at his works. The Mixing of several cultural influences is so lively, and at times overbearing. At one time i used a paper with a window, to isolate parts of his VERY FULL rooms. After several years of looking at his works i think he is still an enigma for me. mirjam
Reply to
mirjam
[...]
Let's hope the horseman doesn't suffer domestic blindness ("you mean it was on upside down?") or unhealthy obsession with detail ("was that an actual *knot* on the back of your assisi work?") as he rides past.
-Fred, guilty (minus horse) of the 'errors' & (lack of) observation.
[and really, what person qualified to judge needlework from horseback would choose riding over stitching or knitting in the first place? And how would you maintain the right thread tension on a horse?]
Reply to
Fred Curtis
"Dr. Brat" wrote >> In a case like that I might just leave it too I've done a couple of Kaffe
Oh snarf (coughing up coffee). Personally, I might use it as an excuse to grab the butt in question, under the guise of fussing over my mistake!
Dawne
Reply to
Dawne Peterson
"anne" wrote .
I make enough mistakes that I look on them as a chance to make creative changes in the work! I frog only really glaring stuff, like borders or lines that won't meet in the middle of otherwise pretty empty spaces, text that is not spacing out properly (I often rewrite verses so they are not insipid). Probably my enjoyment of primitive type patterns or more sketchy looking modern ones is a means of protection against extensive frogging.
Dawne
Reply to
Dawne Peterson
On Mon, 18 Aug 2008 21:23:18 -0400, anne opined:
Anytime I took a course with a designer I always asked that question, plus what about the back of the work ? Most said, re frogging, depends how much it matters to a pattern and will it cause more headache in adjusting for the error and all said so long as the back was not a rats nest, wasting time trying to make it a mirror image was a no go to them, there were far better ways to spend the extra time.
Reply to
lucretia borgia
On 8/18/08 10:47 PM, in article
That was another time. Lets just say, the pendulum as swung completely the other way.
Cheryl
Reply to
Cheryl Isaak
On 8/19/08 7:24 AM, in article snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com,
It's a cute butt, but while we can look, only Brat can touch.
Cheryl
Reply to
Cheryl Isaak

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