Making the plunge

Hello all. I've been woodworking (flat) for a while and have been
amazed at turning long enough - I want to play too.
I need some feedback on lathe opinions. I will not be buying a oneway
so I don't need that kind of advice. I am a very hobby woodworker who
buys way more tools than he needs. With that said I was thinking the
Jet 1442. Seems to be a decent lathe and the right price range. I
thought about the 1236 or a midi but I just can't get past a posting
where someone said 3/4 hp just wasn't enough for face turning.
Opinions? I'd rather buy big once but I have too much going on to be
dedicated to just turning. Will be strickly hobby work.
What I really want to do is to turn bowls and vases and maybe lidded
boxes. I'll do spindles and pens and everything once I get started.
Maybe make a chess set.
Also, Woodcraft is having a 30% off sale next month on Sorby tools.
Gotta watch the budget (buying the whole "flat" shop as well) so is
that a bargain that can't be passed up?
Reply to
Ron S
2 things I forgot
1. How about Grizzly? I have an 8" jointer that I love. The lathes seem to have too high of a low end speed though.
2. Buffalo woodworking show is in less than 2 weeks and I've never been. Any idea if it's reasonable to expect a deal on a Jet lathe there or should I drop $1050+8% at Woodcraft and have it on it's way?
Thanks.
Reply to
Ron S
Let's see, you are a hobby woodworker who buys way more tools than you need, and you are going to start turning? QUICK TURN BACK BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE!!! I would suggest buying used at first if you can. If there is a local Woodcraft, they might have or know of a club. Join the club. It has been my biggest learning experiece in my 9 years of turning. They may also know of a good used lathe for sale. Find out how much you like it, and then upgrade later. If you can afford one of the variable speed models, go for it. The smaller Jet lathes have a Reeves drive which is better than step pulleys. For bowls, the family sized salad bowl is in the 12 plus inch diameter range, so you may want 14 to 16 inch capability and a 1 hp plus motor.For boxes and spindles, chip bowls, and some vases, you can get away with less hp. I also figure that you will end up spending 3 to 10 times as much on tools and accessories than you do on the actual lathe; Chain saw, sanding supplies, dust collection, grinder, chucks, truck or van to haul logs in, shop, insurance (some home owners policies will exclude or even dump you if you have a wood shop, more so if you sell stuff. You have been warned. Are you going to sell stuff to support your habbit? That is a whole different world. I started with flat work, and would rather turn. It is a lot of fun. robo hippy
Reply to
robo hippy
Ron The 14442 seems to be well thought of here on the rec. I use the Craftsman 15" and like it. Others hate it. I began on the old monotube model and still have it as well. Look for a low speed of less than 600 if you can. I like a high speed of 2500 to 3500. The old books recommend a speed of 2500 for a 3" spindle. I do not think that is too fast for a balanced, squared off table leg blank, but for an off balance, rough piece of oak log, it can be scary. On the other hand, for a production run of pens, 2500+ is about right. Whatever you get, join a club, read books, check the web sites, stay safe, this is a lot of fun.. ______ God bless and safe turning Darrell Feltmate Truro, NS, Canada
formatting link

Reply to
Darrell Feltmate
In article ,
Many Grizzly's have too high a low end and a weird head-stock size (1-12tpi) I would avoid those
Look at the General Internation 25-650, should be able to get it for under $2K (US)
Reply to
Ralph E Lindberg
Check out "DELTA CUSTOM LATHE" at aaw.com. This is the American Woodturners Association's site. This custom lathe has many many attachments, extreme slow speed for safe large diameter work, and has arguably the most universal spindle at 1" - 8 thread > In article , > > > 2 things I forgot > > > > 1. How about Grizzly? I have an 8" jointer that I love. The lathes seem > > to have too high of a low end speed though. > > > Many Grizzly's have too high a low end and a weird head-stock size > (1-12tpi) I would avoid those > > > 2. Buffalo woodworking show is in less than 2 weeks and I've never > > been. Any idea if it's reasonable to expect a deal on a Jet lathe there > > or should I drop $1050+8% at Woodcraft and have it on it's way? > > > Look at the General Internation 25-650, should be able to get it for > under $2K (US) > > -- > -------------------------------------------------------- > Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org > This posting address is a spam-trap and seldom read > RV and Camping FAQ can be found at >
formatting link
Reply to
acat40
in news: snipped-for-privacy@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com:
Did you mean to send us to a alcholism site?
Patriarch
Reply to
Patriarch
Which may mean reducing an older piece of iron. Not difficult to do. I have eight speeds, use two (360/690) regularly, one (180) occasionally. So if you 2:1 one of the old types you'd have pretty much what you wanted, but the older were mostly 12" swing or less.
Reply to
George
Ron I bought the Jet 1442 VS last year at Woodcraft. It happened to be on sale for around $650 at the time. Even without that, it beat the Delta IMHO for features, at a similar price. For instance, it was heavier, the legs alone weighed well over 100 lbs. Since then, I have been very pleased. I, too, am a hobbiest, turn mostly bowls and pens and the occasional lamp or other spindle project. I had been using an old Craftsman, with tubular steel bed, very light and prone to much vibration. I am quite happy with the Jet. I am also sure there are as many opinions here as there are turners. :\ .
Whatever you choose, welcome to the turning world.
Reply to
Doc Ron
In article ,
It would be useful if you get even close to the website. Do you mean the American Association of Woodturners at
formatting link
Now I've been a member for a little while, but I've never heard of this. Also, the web site's search engine has no reference to -any- Delta lathes. In fact the only reference to any lathe I could find is the Powermatic they are giving away to some lucky member
Reply to
Ralph E Lindberg
Been thinking more about this discussion, as to what lathe to get. As I said, probably as many opinions as people. I think, mostly, that whatever lathe we have will work for us. There are certainly bad pieces of technology and engineering out there. The marketplace may get rid of them eventually, and this and other such forums are certainly great places to spot the problems that do exist, to help us avoid them.
This craft we practice has elements of science, engineering, art, and beauty - that's why this old scientist loves it, he gets to use both halves of his brain. I have had only two lathes. I used the one until the machine's limitations became too bothersome, then I moved on. So my advice is - research the features and ask questions of the knowedgeable and experienced folks here. Then buy whatever seems reasonable within your budget. Practice, practice, take lessons, talk to turners, look at videos, read books, join a club -- and you will be amazed at how far you get. When you get to the point when you need to, save your pennies and move up - or not. Ultimately, it may well be that the process we experience and the products we make are limited more by our own abilities than by the equipment. I think I made some pretty nice things on that old Craftsman, even though I did have to wedge blocks under the lathe bed to stop the vibration sometimes when I tried to work beyond its capacity.
Good luck!
Reply to
Doc Ron
Been thinking more about this discussion, as to what lathe to get. As I said, probably as many opinions as people. I think, mostly, that whatever lathe we have will work for us. There are certainly bad pieces of technology and engineering out there. The marketplace may get rid of them eventually, and this and other such forums are certainly great places to spot the problems that do exist, to help us avoid them.
This craft we paractice has elements of science, engineering, art, and beauty - that's why this old scientist loves it, he gets to use both halves of his brain. I have had only two lathes. I used the one until the machine's limitations became too bothersome, then I moved on. So my advice is - research the features and ask questions of the knowedgeable and experienced folks here. Then buy whatever seems reasonable within your budget. Practice, practice, take lessons, talk to turners, look at videos, read books, join a club -- and you will be amazed at how far you get. When you get to the point when you need to, save your pennies and move up - or not. Ultimately, it may well be that the process we experience and the products we make are limited more by our own abilities than by the equipment. I think I made some pretty nice things on that old Craftsman, even though I did have to wedge blocks under the lathe bed to stop the vibration sometimes when I tried to work beyond its capacity.
Good luck!
Reply to
Doc Ron

Site Timeline Threads

InspirePoint website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.