Cloth shopping bags.

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     I dont think this is off topic.  Recently the little town of Leaf
Rapids in  Manitoba, and San Fransisco have outlawed plastic shopping
bags, insisting people use cloth bags instead.  I saw pictures of those in
Leaf Rapids, and they were in nice bright colors.
     I have been using cloth bags for years, and some months ago, the
manager of our local supermarket was on duty at the cash, and he congratulated
me on how clean my bags were.  He told me some of the bags people brought in
were so filthy, he did not even like handling them.  Obviously if you are
going to use cloth bags for food, they are going to get dirty.  So whoever
insists on people using cloth bags should also conduct a campaign to
ensure people wash them regularly.  And they need to be washed in bleach.
     It seems to me that if you have cheap bags with bright colors, it is
all the tea in China to a bad egg that the colors are not colorfast.  So a
few times in the washing machine, particularly with bleach, and heaven
knows what color they will be.  Such bags should be white, and the
washing instructions should be similar to those on Tilley Endurables "Give
'em Hell.  Safe to wash with any detergent and/or bleach at any temperature".

Re: Cloth shopping bags.
F.James Cripwell wrote:
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Love it!  I saw the article on line.  Very interesting!!  I will add
that I think ivory, ecru . . . those hold up well colorwise with
bleaching.  Especially the canvas bags.

Dianne

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Embroidery Discussions at http://www.heritageshoppe.com/forum

Re: Cloth shopping bags.
F.James Cripwell wrote:
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Bravo!  Mine go in the washer on a regular basis.

My biggest problem with bringing my own bags to the supermarket is the
insistence of the baggers that they cannot put more than two items in
any bag, so I show up with my huge canvas tote (probably the size of a
VW Bug trunk -- plenty large enough to hold a week's food for one
person), and when I turn around, they've put the bread and eggs in the
tote and assembled 3000 plastic bags with my other purchases.

Since the net effect is to save one plastic bag (and waste those 3000
others, which they don't quite know what to do with when I empty them
and hand them back), when I'm going in a friend's car (as opposed to
taking the bus) I'm not as diligent at bringing my canvas bags as I
should be.

I do, however, re-use the plastic bags as trash can liners, packing
material, collecting recycling to be taken to the big can outside, so
it's not like they're just thrown directly in the trash without a second
use.

--

Karen C - California
www.CFSfacts.org where we give you the facts and dispel the myths
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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
On 4/2/07 6:07 PM, in article snipped-for-privacy@mid.individual.net, "Karen C -

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I have several bags, including a "cold bag" that I use as much as possible.
Haven't thought about washing them though.

C


Re: Cloth shopping bags.
I always sew cloth bags , with leftovers from my regular sewing .
Skirts with matching bags etc,,,, i also give cloth bags as presents,
and people enjoy folding them into the other purse size bag to use
when they shop ,,,
All my bags go into the washing machine regulary.
mirjam

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.

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One thing that I don't think has been quite thought out are grocery
deliveries.  One store puts everything in boxes which are recyclable
as cardboard.  Another uses plastic bags.  A third uses paper bags
inside plastic bags.  The delivery person needs bags with handles to
carry them up our flights of stairs.  The boxes work but they're hard
to stack up and carry upstairs.  I could bring canvas bags but I'd
need a lot and I'd worry about not getting them in the delivery?

Thoughts?

Alison

Re: Cloth shopping bags.
Alison wrote:

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Tell the store to call U-Haul and find out where they buy their
stair-climbing handtrucks.

When WebVan was in business, they put all your groceries in large
plastic totes with lids.  (One color for cold stuff, another for
everything else.)  If they left the boxes with you, they charged a
$5/each deposit, and you returned them when they delivered the next order.

The boxes worked nicely with the stair-climbing handtrucks.  Corralled
everything so nothing was bouncing out of bags, they could stack two or
three on the handtruck, one trip up the stairs and they were done.

When WebVan went out of business, I was quite pleased to acquire the
three boxes I was waiting to return.  They're large enough to be really
useful for storing stuff like yarn.

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Karen C - California
www.CFSfacts.org where we give you the facts and dispel the myths
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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
I have a large selection of canvas shopping bags.  Some of them came
"free" with a hefty donation to various good causes, then after I
started using them for groceries I found lots more at various yard or
estate sales - many of them brand new, never used.  I keep some of them
in the car, and some in the folding wheeled shopping basket I use when
going to the "walking distance" stores around here.

In additon to being better for the environment than either paper or
plastic, they also are easier to carry.

Olwyn Mary in New Orleans.

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.

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All true.  When I lived in the city in Pgh, I had the wheeled cart thing -
not worth driving for a couple of blocks.  Around here, most of the
groceries sell for very cheap large mesh bags - which are a little lighter
than canvas, and seem to be made of some recycled material.  Some of the
stores give you a few cents rebate if you use one.

ellice


Re: Cloth shopping bags.
ellice wrote:
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DS and his SO bought hubby and me recyclable bags for Christmas last
year. We love 'em. I was looking online to show y'all, and found this
great resource:

http://www.reusablebags.com /

These are the ones we have:
http://www.reusablebags.com/store/acme-bags-earth-tote%E2%84%A2-heavy-duty-reusable-shopping-p-10.html #


But look at this one. It's awesome for walkers:

http://www.reusablebags.com/store/reisenthel-foldable-trolley-p-731.html

HTH,
Sue





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Susan Hartman/Dirty Linen
The Magazine of Folk and World Music
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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
I LOVE this idea! I have used some of the other fabric bags, but they
rae hard to fill. I think I will check with my grocery store, and see
what they think of me using them!!

Gillian

Susan Hartman wrote:
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http://www.reusablebags.com/store/acme-bags-earth-tote%E2%84%A2-heavy-duty-reusable-shopping-p-10.html#
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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
Here you can buy White Cotton cloth bags that are meant to cook
certain  vegies in the soup with them , and than take out, These bags
are great for many other foods to buy ,, i have 1 or 2 folded in my
Cloth bags,,,,, I also advise people to have a Crochet Ball Bag.
mirjam

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
This discussion has reminded me of the string bags women used for
shopping when I was a little girl. Some used baskets, which are
still available, but I haven't seen the old string bags for years.

Are they still available, or does anyone know how to make them?

Rosemary in Melbourne, Australia (hoping they weren't just a local
thing)



On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 21:30:42 GMT, Gill Murray

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
Rosemary Peeler wrote:

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I can't lay my hands on the booklet with the instructions, but I
remember enough to tell you how to fake it.

Buy some crochet cotton and chain a circle.  Then chain umpteen loops
going into that circle.  (I'd say, make loops till you run out of room
in the circle.) On each round, slip stitch across the first loop to the
halfway point, then begin chaining a loop into each loop in the round
before.  Ad nauseum or until you're about to run out of crochet cotton,
whichever comes first.  Then affix sturdy handles of some sort.

Size of loops would depend on what you're buying.  Obviously, you could
get away with larger holes in the bag if you're planning to buy
pineapples than if you're planning to buy peppermint sticks and cherry
tomatoes.


--

Karen C - California
www.CFSfacts.org where we give you the facts and dispel the myths
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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
That sounds like it would produce something just like I remember.

Rosemary :)


On Sat, 07 Apr 2007 22:38:36 -0700, Karen C - California

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
Try http://www.angelfire.com/folk/celtwich/Longshop.html for the directions
on crocheting a long string bag. It goes to 44 inches. Vary length to
whatever you want. The only string bags I have are originally coaches bags
for soccer balls. They make great totes for carrying all the summer beach
toys. At the end of the day, you just put all the toys in the bag and then
hose it off to get rid of the sand. The angelfire site has lots of
different crochet patterns. My wife crochets, but every once in a while I
have to help her if there is a stitch she hasn't done before. Latest
stitches for her are triple crochet, back post and foward post.

George

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
George,

Your mention of the different stitches at the end of your post has
reminded me that I think we call crochet stitches different names,
or worse than that use the same name for a different stitch. :)

I'm sure I can find a conversion though. Otherwise I'd get a
different, but still useful, result.

Thanks again all.

Rosemary


On 09 Apr 2007 14:46:21 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
True enough, Rosemary.  I assume you use the Europian/UK conventions.

http://www.wiseneedle.com/string-or-nothing/PermaLink,guid,08988d40-96e4-8720-004a-0007e96ddfa0.aspx

Tara

On Tue, 10 Apr 2007 10:53:44 +1000, Rosemary Peeler

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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
Yes, we do.

Rosemary



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Re: Cloth shopping bags.
PS Thank you for the website. :)

Rosemary



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