Question about quilt patterns

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I have mentioned in another thread that I am getting ready to go to
print very soon on some patterns. I would like some input on what you
all like and dislike about patterns you have, or have seen.

One of the comments I have had with some of my patterns is "too much
information". I like to give info, because I feel that the more info you
have the easier it is to understand the whys and such. Is there such a
thing as too much info in a pattern??

What sizes of quilts do you most like to make? I have suggestions with
all my patterns for how to make different sizes, how many different
sizes do you like to see in a pattern?  The problem comes up with
putting in the fabric requirements for multiple sizes. I don't like to
print too small, because it gets confusing.
Would something like "you can get X (number) blocks from Y amount of
fabrics" and a short explanation of figuring borders be satisfactory as
an addition to a specific chart for, say, 3 different sizes of quilt? (a
small wallhanging/crib size, a throw and a larger quilt for example.)

Many of the patterns I am working on are "modern" interpretations of
traditional blocks. I like the history of the blocks and such. (That is
part of why my company name is "Then and Now Patterns". <G>) I plan to
put just a brief paragraph about the block and its background, names and
  such at the beginning of the pattern instructions. (This is part of
the "too much info" comment.) How do you feel about this idea? ( I think
that connecting to the past is an important part of quilting, and one
that too often is ignored. I really like to know the name of the block
being used and so on. Many times this information is not given and it
bothers *me*, but might not be at all important to others.)

How important is the name of the pattern to you?

Thanks for your input,
Pati, in Phx

Re: Question about quilt patterns
I wouldn't be interested in the history of the block, but I can see where
some folks would be.  I think the too much information is in regard to
rambling.  If the information is concise then that's good and go ahead and
include whatever you can to help the person using the pattern.  The
organization and for the instructions to progress in an orderly fashion is
the most important.  (I've seen patterns where clever 'little personal
experiences' where jammed into every paragraph or so and it drove me crazy
for trying to find the important parts!)  Maybe putting tips to the side in
a blocked out are where appropriate?  That would keep those who are
experienced from having to wade thru stuff they know and it would alert
newbies to check them out for additional help.  As far as the sizes- maybe a
baby/lap size pattern with info on adding borders and not try to cover every
size imaginable???

Good luck!

Leslie, Missy & The Furbabies in MO.
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Re: Question about quilt patterns
The first thing you have to remember is that you  won't please everyone.
Having said that, I like the idea of reading some history about the pattern
as long as there is enough separation between the story and the
instructions.  Perhaps you can have the history on a website and provide the
link in the pattern for those that would like to have additional
information.

I like seeing diagrams and other graphical representations of the
instructions as well as the text of the instructions.  I like patterns that
include crib, lap, twin, queen/king, but I know that's a lot.  Sometimes the
pattern does not lend itself well to a crib if it's really meant as a
pattern for a larger bed so some sizes may not be practical.  I really like
to see a grid that contains the amount of fabrics needed for the variety of
sizes offered.  I don't have a preference for the name of the pattern but I
prefer to see a large picture of the finished quilt on the pattern front so
you get an idea of what it will look like.  I don't like photographs glued
to the pattern package.  They are generally too small and provide too little
detail of the finished product.

It's important that any special tools or supplies that will be needed be
included in the supplies list, perhaps bolded or with a "Note:" indication.
Also, a website or email address to go to if there are questions.  I would
paginate if there are multiple pages.

I hope this helps.  Good luck with your printing, I will look forward to
seeing the patterns!

Alice
"Do what you like, like what you do"




:I have mentioned in another thread that I am getting ready to go to
: print very soon on some patterns. I would like some input on what you
: all like and dislike about patterns you have, or have seen.
:
: One of the comments I have had with some of my patterns is "too much
: information". I like to give info, because I feel that the more info you
: have the easier it is to understand the whys and such. Is there such a
: thing as too much info in a pattern??
:
: What sizes of quilts do you most like to make? I have suggestions with
: all my patterns for how to make different sizes, how many different
: sizes do you like to see in a pattern?  The problem comes up with
: putting in the fabric requirements for multiple sizes. I don't like to
: print too small, because it gets confusing.
: Would something like "you can get X (number) blocks from Y amount of
: fabrics" and a short explanation of figuring borders be satisfactory as
: an addition to a specific chart for, say, 3 different sizes of quilt? (a
: small wallhanging/crib size, a throw and a larger quilt for example.)
:
: Many of the patterns I am working on are "modern" interpretations of
: traditional blocks. I like the history of the blocks and such. (That is
: part of why my company name is "Then and Now Patterns". <G>) I plan to
: put just a brief paragraph about the block and its background, names and
:  such at the beginning of the pattern instructions. (This is part of
: the "too much info" comment.) How do you feel about this idea? ( I think
: that connecting to the past is an important part of quilting, and one
: that too often is ignored. I really like to know the name of the block
: being used and so on. Many times this information is not given and it
: bothers *me*, but might not be at all important to others.)
:
: How important is the name of the pattern to you?
:
: Thanks for your input,
: Pati, in Phx



Re: Question about quilt patterns
Pati C. wrote:
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I ran into some of these questions when preparing for my guild's box
exchange earlier this year.  The idea was for each person to put a block
in a box along with instructions on how to make it.  Each month the
boxes are passed along.  The recipient has to make the block with
fabrics that look good with the blocks already in the box.  I dithered
over how to write the instructions.  I wasn't sure if I needed to tell
people how to make half square triangles.  I wanted to say "you could
make it this way, unless you think this is easier, or if you're used to
doing it like this ..."


Now I'm seeing the instructions that other people have written.  On
some, it's pretty confusing.  Fortunately, I'm pretty good at figuring
out how to add seam allowance to basic shapes, so I'm O.K. with just the
picture and the samples, but I can see where others have left badly made
blocks in the box.


I don't think there's such a thing as too much information, but there is
badly organized information.  I think I'd like to see a pattern
formatted the way it is in Quilter's Newsletter Magazine with just the
basic block and the way it goes together first.  That could be followed
by more in depth instruction, tips, things a beginner might like to
know, put in more as a footnote.  You could say "place the blocks on
point," in the main part of the instructions, and then say "for more
information on putting blocks on point, look here" at the end.


For bed quilts (as opposed to art pieces), I normally make 2 sizes:  the
40" x 40" toddler quilt (big enough cuddle with when small, then large
enough to turn into a superman cape when bigger), and the 80" x 80"
queen size wedding gift.  That could go on a twin size bed also and
could be taken to college if it's a graduation gift.  Lots of people
make lap quilts, but in my world, I generally don't.  (There are
exceptions to this as when my guild got involved with making quilts for
cancer patients, but I'm trying to give the sizes I make most often.)


I hardly know how to answer the "x number of blocks from y number of
fabrics" question because I think that's basic math.  If you're going to
answer everything, you might as well include a 5th grade primer that
reviews long divisision and fractions.  On the other hand, I know that
no one is born knowing these things, and sometimes it is helpful to have
it worked out in chart form.  A beginner might know basic math but need
help applying it to making a quilt.  I'd err on the side of giving more
information.


I LOVE the idea of including historical information.  Pointers given to
antique quilts based on the same block are great.  That's information
that the buyer might genuninely not know and have a hard time finding
elsewhere.  The name of the pattern is important to me and is a plus.


I tend not to buy patterns.  I do subscribe to magazines, and I love
looking at photos of quilts for ideas, but I rarely work from a pattern,
and when I do, I find that getting patterns from books is a better buy.
  I get more, and they last longer.  I'm not the customer you're
shooting for, so doing market research on me probably isn't as useful as
getting the opinion of someone buying a pattern at a show.  I'll be
interested in others' thoughts on this.


--Lia


Re: Question about quilt patterns
Julia, do you really make queens at 80x80?  A queen bed is 60X80 and that
wouldn't allow for any drop at the end of the bed and not much at the
sides???  Maybe my brain isn't engaged yet this morning....

Leslie, Missy & The Furbabies in MO.

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Re: Question about quilt patterns
Leslie & The Furbabies in MO. wrote:
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Maybe I shouldn't call them queen size, but I do make wedding gifts
80"x80".  I've made one quilt larger, and it drove me crazy.  Between
the weight and trying to get it scrunched under my short-arm, it was a
much bigger bother than the extra size would suggest.  I use 80"x80"
quilts on my own queen size beds, and you're right, there isn't any
drop.  They're mostly decorative.  The comforters are for warmth.


--Lia


Re: Question about quilt patterns
I hope you've had someone test drive the pattern (as it will be printed) by
someone who hasn't made the quilt until they used your pattern.

The reason I say this:  A few years ago I bought a pattern that was
self-published by the pattern designer.  She had her husband do the actual
write up and diagram for her (I guess she wasn't computer literate).  Since
she hadn't bothered to even look at the pattern after he had finished with
it or have someone else work from it, she had no idea that her pattern had
some glaring errors until I pointed it out to her.

If you put the history, or any additional info you would like to add, in a
separate box I think it would work well.  Also, there's a difference between
too much information and information that isn't concise.  If the additional
info is in a separate box, the quilter can just ignore it and won't have to
wade through it to see if that info is actually needed to make the quilt.

Also, please have someone else check your spelling (I'm not saying you can't
spell, but when you proofread your own work, you see what was meant, not
what is there!  I speak from experience from the two newsletters that I do.)
I don't know how many patterns I've bought that had the word "taut" spelled
incorrectly!  Taunt and taught aren't taut!  I once bought a pattern for a
chatelaine - she spelled medieval throughout the pattern as mid-evil!  She
was trying to tell us that medieval ladies made and used chatelaines!

Good luck with your new endeavor!

Donna in (SW) Idaho

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Re: Question about quilt patterns
I think if you company name is then and now, and the history of the block is
important to your own image of your company, why notput it in... those who
dont want to read itdont have to.
As for patterns, I have had a few that tell you how to make the block, and
what the end size should be etc etc and never give you a clue how big to cut
your fabric to accomplish this feat.  Like make 4 hst all with a finished
size of 4in.  How big to do need to get that 4 in??  I didnt even know that
was the intention when I started, and cut the squares 4ins made them into
hst and ended up with a block that was 2 inches short.  It was frusterating
to go back and figure out how to make a 4in hst  ( that 4in thing is just my
imagination btw I cant remeber the sizes the pattern specified) but I paid
for that silly pattern.  And I have a whole book of patterns that dont give
you any clue at all as to the size the pieecs need to be cut in order to
make the block  grrrr.  So if you want a pretty book of pictures of blocks
its nice, but if ant to make them... it says choose your favorite size arg
lol.

Carissa

--
http://community.webshots.com/user/Elywyn
Butterflies are not insects, they are
We've slightly trimmed the long signature. Click to see the full one.
Re: Question about quilt patterns
If I don't have someone to help me proofread, I read the text backwards from
the bottom right to the top left.  Amazingly, it works!

Alice
"Do what you like, like what you do"




:I hope you've had someone test drive the pattern (as it will be printed) by
: someone who hasn't made the quilt until they used your pattern.
:
: The reason I say this:  A few years ago I bought a pattern that was
: self-published by the pattern designer.  She had her husband do the actual
: write up and diagram for her (I guess she wasn't computer literate).
Since
: she hadn't bothered to even look at the pattern after he had finished with
: it or have someone else work from it, she had no idea that her pattern had
: some glaring errors until I pointed it out to her.
:
: If you put the history, or any additional info you would like to add, in a
: separate box I think it would work well.  Also, there's a difference
between
: too much information and information that isn't concise.  If the
additional
: info is in a separate box, the quilter can just ignore it and won't have
to
: wade through it to see if that info is actually needed to make the quilt.
:
: Also, please have someone else check your spelling (I'm not saying you
can't
: spell, but when you proofread your own work, you see what was meant, not
: what is there!  I speak from experience from the two newsletters that I
do.)
: I don't know how many patterns I've bought that had the word "taut"
spelled
: incorrectly!  Taunt and taught aren't taut!  I once bought a pattern for a
: chatelaine - she spelled medieval throughout the pattern as mid-evil!  She
: was trying to tell us that medieval ladies made and used chatelaines!
:
: Good luck with your new endeavor!
:
: Donna in (SW) Idaho
:
: >I have mentioned in another thread that I am getting ready to go to print
: >very soon on some patterns. I would like some input on what you all like
: >and dislike about patterns you have, or have seen.
: >
: > One of the comments I have had with some of my patterns is "too much
: > information". I like to give info, because I feel that the more info you
: > have the easier it is to understand the whys and such. Is there such a
: > thing as too much info in a pattern??
: >
: > What sizes of quilts do you most like to make? I have suggestions with
all
: > my patterns for how to make different sizes, how many different sizes do
: > you like to see in a pattern?  The problem comes up with putting in the
: > fabric requirements for multiple sizes. I don't like to print too small,
: > because it gets confusing.
: > Would something like "you can get X (number) blocks from Y amount of
: > fabrics" and a short explanation of figuring borders be satisfactory as
an
: > addition to a specific chart for, say, 3 different sizes of quilt? (a
: > small wallhanging/crib size, a throw and a larger quilt for example.)
: >
: > Many of the patterns I am working on are "modern" interpretations of
: > traditional blocks. I like the history of the blocks and such. (That is
: > part of why my company name is "Then and Now Patterns". <G>) I plan to
put
: > just a brief paragraph about the block and its background, names and
such
: > at the beginning of the pattern instructions. (This is part of the "too
: > much info" comment.) How do you feel about this idea? ( I think that
: > connecting to the past is an important part of quilting, and one that
too
: > often is ignored. I really like to know the name of the block being used
: > and so on. Many times this information is not given and it bothers *me*,
: > but might not be at all important to others.)
: >
: > How important is the name of the pattern to you?
: >
: > Thanks for your input,
: > Pati, in Phx
:
:



Re: Question about quilt patterns
Pati:
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Not unless the info is incorrect. Accuracy in measurments is always a
plus. If you are printing templates, please include a disclaimer that
the picture shown may be distorted during printing.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

i mostly make full size quilts (84 X 100 or so), but lap and baby are
nice to see. i agree with the statement made to use a format like
Quilter's Newsletter. i like those, they are so easy to follow.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not really. i think most people will be able to figure yardage. i know
i always buy more than i need.
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I, too, love the stories about blocks and old patterns. Just a snippet
or two would be nice. Dont go overboard and write and article.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
See above.....

Your welcome! i cant wait to see what you've done.
BTW: i need the name of your last book. i lost it and want to go get
it!

amy in CNY


Re: Question about quilt patterns
So often, I wish pattern instructions would go a bit further.  They will
say, "Cut 172 of B".  What they don't say is that you will need 14 B of
*each* color (or for each rhodendrum).
    I never pay any mind to a pattern's notion of fabric required.  The
designer has no way of knowing how many pieces I'll cut wrong or stitch
wrong.  I guess they're a good place to start but it's a good thing when I
have plenty to spare.
    And for Heaven's Sake, I do wish I'd pay better attention to
instructions.  Last night I tried a paper piece little tulip block.  There
was a warning:  It contains 3 sections and a total of 17 patches.  The tulip
is now posted on my bulletin board; seriously wonky and a reminder to read
the instructions first.  Polly


Pati:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Not unless the info is incorrect. Accuracy in measurments is always a
plus. If you are printing templates, please include a disclaimer that
the picture shown may be distorted during printing.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

i mostly make full size quilts (84 X 100 or so), but lap and baby are
nice to see. i agree with the statement made to use a format like
Quilter's Newsletter. i like those, they are so easy to follow.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not really. i think most people will be able to figure yardage. i know
i always buy more than i need.
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I, too, love the stories about blocks and old patterns. Just a snippet
or two would be nice. Dont go overboard and write and article.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
See above.....

Your welcome! i cant wait to see what you've done.
BTW: i need the name of your last book. i lost it and want to go get
it!

amy in CNY



Re: Question about quilt patterns
I've had a couple of patterns that confused me with the way the copies
were printed.
They seemed to be inexpensively printed by a home machine in shades of
gray only. They would show how to put piece A over piece B to stitch,
but the A was almost the same shade of gray as the B and I, for the life
of me, couldn't figure out what color of gray represented what color of
material.  

My girlfriend finally figured out that one shade of gray represented the
right side of a fabric, and the slightly darker shade of gray
represented the back of the fabric.  No where in the instructions were
we told how to interpret the various shades of gray,  It was really
weird.

I was at my favorite LQS, Bunkhouse Quilts, in Lyndeborough, NH. and
fell in love with a 50% off applique Nativity scene. The packaging
seemed thin, so I opened it up to find most of the patterns missing from
the kit.  I asked the clerk, who then opened every similar package, and
the same pieces were missing from everyone of them.  

Saturday I bought a kit for the Chicken pin cushion, which was discussed
here lately, and when I started to read the instructions, found that one
paragraph was printed upside-down.  That paragraph referred to an item
"below", well, below was the top of the page because I had to read the
page upside down. The "below" to which it referred was actually above
the paragraph, because the paragraph was upside down.  Confused yet??

Who the heck proof reads these things.  These mistakes would be
noticeable to a first grader who never quilted in his life.

Denise
http://community.webtv.net/DeniseJG /
My QI


Re: Question about quilt patterns
LOL  wrong "Pati", I don't have a book out. <G> Patty in England has a
book out.... "Geometrical Quilts" I believe is the title. <G>

Thanks though.
Pati, in Phx

amy wrote:

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Re: Question about quilt patterns
I've never thought about the name of a pattern!
Don't know that I remember many - just what they are going to
facilitate.

If you are putting extra information in with the pattern, I think it
should be there, for the people who will be interested in it.  But, from
my own experience, I use a different font style and size for that part.
If you are putting your patterns into a plastic envelope/bag-type
thingy. the information which is completely unnecessary for the making
of the article, can be put on a small single sheet, and not incorporated
into the instructions at all.  Then it can be absorbed or ignored at
will.

One of the most valuable things I find with any instructions is how to
make the 'thing' in different sizes.  I don't know about saying you can
get so many blocks from a specific amount of fabric, as they might want
to distribute colours differently, however, some guide would be helpful.
One of the easiest rule of thumb facts you can give is that increasing
sides by two means increasing area - thus fabric quantity - by four.
The more you can do by a diagram the better I think.  Can you
superimpose the three sizes one on the other - keeping one corner stable
and increasing so that the other three corners go outwards?  I prefer
that to having them placed completely inside one another with gaps all
round.  I think you can a better idea of sizing when done the first way
- but that might be a very personal preference?  I simply don't know.
.
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--
Best Regards
pat on the hill

Re: Question about quilt patterns
snip-

Would something like "you can get X (number) blocks from Y amount of
fabrics"

snip-

Pati, some beginner's might not know how many blocks they need- or an
advanced quilter might mess the colors all around- if they wanted a queen
size or a baby quilt, etc.  Then they would have to calculate the borders,
too, and refigure the backing, binding, etc.  I think that's not going to be
specific enough.  I sure would not want to be in your position of trying to
accommodate everybody's differing wants and needs.  I know pattern designers
do it all the time (Hi Pat on your hill!  VBG) but choosing how many sizes
and how many variables is going to be difficult to say the least.  Again,
best wishes for fabulous success with your pattern line and good luck with
what to include or not.

Leslie, Missy & The Furbabies in MO.

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Re: Question about quilt patterns

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For me, yes.  That's one reason I don't buy Lazy Girl patterns.  She takes
forever to describe something that could be said in about 3 pages less. I
might try out a new designer's patterns, but only one if there's a lot of
unnecessary informaton.

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This would be way too much material to bother to read for me, but again, I
don't have any interest in historical stuff or old quilts.  If you include
it, maybe on a separate paper in the envelope, rather than part of the
pattern, so one doesn't have to wade thru that to get to the cutting and
sewing informaton.  I guess I like things cut and dried, without a lot of
extra info.
Gen



Re: Question about quilt patterns
- Please give finished quilt size (or sizes, if you include multiple
sizes) block size, and number of blocks required on the back of the
pattern, along with fabric requirements. I would rather see the block
size and number of blocks for one or two finished sizes than to have a
lot of finished sizes. It's much easier to adapt to other sizes if I
don't have to figure out the block size for myself.
- I make mostly baby quilts, lap quilts, and queen size (84 x 100 or
so). Keep in mind that many mattresses these days are really deep and
most people want the quilt to completely cover the mattress.
- If it is practical, it's nice if the cover shows color photos of the
quilt in more than one color; it helps me imagine the quilt in other
color combinations.
- If you can make it work with the design, a border or other design
element that falls at the edge of the mattress makes bed making easier.
- If a particular tool is useful, but not required, mention that.
Be generous with your yardages: allow for miscutting a strip.
- The history of the block would be interesting, but maybe in a sidebar
or box.
- Instructions should be concise, complete, and, above all, accurate. If
you can separate detail from the basic instructions, that could be
helpful. Diagrams are sometimes helpful. I especially like to see a
diagram of the finished block.
- Have someone who hasn't made the pattern make the quilt using your
instructions. That someone should be a person who has minimum quilt
making experience required for the pattern; that is, if it is a fairly
simple, basic pattern, give it to a relatively inexperienced quilter.
Susan Cleveland likes to teach a class for her patterns before
publishing them so that she sees what kind of problems real live
quilters face with the pattern and can modify accordingly. She decided
to self-publish her recent book because she couldn't find a publisher
who would let her teach the patterns before the book was published. Her
book actually includes photos of some of the student quilts.
- Name of the pattern is not important. If you are using a single
traditional block, consider including the block name in the name of your
quilt. Minor consideration: avoid naming your pattern something based on
the colors you used for your sample; for example, "Yellow Brick Road" is
catchy and describes the quilt on the pattern envelope, but is not real
descriptive when you use it for a red quilt. In general, the picture on
the front influences my purchase much more than the name, though I must
admit I couldn't resist a pattern called "Julia's Lily" :)

Julia in MN
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Pati C. wrote:
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Re: Question about quilt patterns
I don't usually buy patterns but, on the other hand, I DID buy one last
summer and I thought that it was very clear and well laid out.  So here
goes with my 2cents worth...

The pattern that I bought used a bunch of FQ.  In the instructions there
was a table with the various quilt sizes indicating how many FQ and how
much fabric for sashing/border was needed for each size of quilt.  I
found this VERY handy - I could just circle or highlight the info that
corresponded to the size I wanted to make and didn't have to start
calculating on my own.  (By having the info available for different
sizes you would attract more potential buyers I think ....for me at any
rate, if the details for a queen size quilt weren't already there I
would not have bought the pattern).

Then the instructions - first for cutting.  Again, a table with how many
of each size piece were needed for each final size quilt.
Then the block assembly.  Here she had some diagrams.  And, again, a
table of how many of each size block were needed for each size of quilt.

Then a diagram of block layout.  She did a sample layout with a smaller
size to give an idea of how to fit it together and it was pretty easy to
extrapolate to a larger quilt.

As for too much information.  Well, if all your info is well labeled
(maybe put the critical bits in bold?) then it would be easier to skip
over something that is not needed.

If you are doing historical blocks I really like the idea of giving the
name of the block and the history behind it. If that is in a separate
section of the instructions then people who are less interested can just
skip over it.

Good luck!
Allison in MOntreal




Pati C. wrote:
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Re: Question about quilt patterns
Assuming you're producing individual patterns in plastic envelopes, here's
my list [some of them learned the hard way]
DO: Include a clear colour photo/drawing of the finished quilt on the
envelope front. If it's a table runner, make sure that the entire runner is
visible.[minus candlesticks and table centres etc.] If you photograph a bed
quilt on the bed, make sure that the whole quilt shows and there are no
distracting elements [pillows covering design elements, bedside tables with
family photos and clutter etc.]
DO: have the fabric requirements, special tools needed etc. clearly listed
on the back side. If quilters are buying the fabric at the same time,
they'll want to be able to see what else they need to buy
DO NOT list the cut sizes of individual patches NOR show a diagram of the
finished block/quilt on the back side. [I did that with one of my patterns
and then found more than one quilter writing down the cut sizes of the
patches, sketching the block and putting the pattern back saying "I can
figure that out from there"]
*DO include "extra" information like your historical info [in my case, Bible
block info] on the back side as space allows: that may draw people to buy
the pattern. That also leaves you room for necessary instruction on the
remaining pages.
DO indicate skill level IN WORDS not in fancy symbols that can mean
anything. Beginner, Confident Beginner, Intermediate, Experienced.
DO indicate any skills quilters will need beforehand : rotary cutting; hand
or machine applique, machine piecing, etc.
DO add hints, suggestions, what if? comments in boxes or margin notes,
preferably in italic or another font to make them easy to spot [and easy to
skip too!]

Here's how that works for me: a separate [glossy] sheet with photo of the
quilt, name of the quilt and size[s];  my logo and company info goes in the
front of the envelope. On the back of the last sheet [so it shows when you
flip the plastic envelope over]: brief description (including, in my
case--Bible passage; in yours--*Historical information), fabric
requirements, supply list, and skill level plus any skills needed [e.g.:
basic rotary cutting and machine piecing skills are needed] Don't forget
your copyright notice [including year].

* If your pattern depends on unique pairing of traditional blocks, I
wouldn't list that anywhere on the outside: once a quilter knows that it's
"just"  a Puss-in-the-corner alternating with Hole-in-the-barn-door, she may
decide to build her own and forego the pattern. You could call your pattern
"Puss in the Barn" [or Hole in the Corner, for that matter] and name the
blocks where appropriate in the instructions, but do be careful not to give
your hard work away.

There's my more than 2 cents worth!
--
Kim Graham
http://members.shaw.ca/kigraham
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Re: Question about quilt patterns
If it's applique, indicate the applique method that you suggest -- hand
or machine, and if machine, fusible or other. And some patterns, it
doesn't really matter. Some patterns are better suited to one method
than to another, and I would like to know that up front. I might still
buy the pattern, but I would have a little better idea of what I was
getting.

Julia in MN
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