OT: Good or Bad???

First let me start by thanking everybody profusely for all the good vibes. I
haven't heard anything lately, so I'm going to take it as no news is good news.
Still, I'm pretty worried because his status *was* serious, but stable, and is
now critical but stable. *sigh*
On top of all that, I found out that my mom will have a hysterectomy Sept. 1.
Precancerous cells. Which very well may affect me in the future. Plus, dealing
with nit wits....One certain person tried to drive their car off the side of an
elevated driveway. A few inches further and the vehicle would have been laying
in the side yard on its side. *double sigh*
Now I've been trying to set up my mom's computer so she can get on the net when
she's off from her surgery. Not happening. But yet she keeps bugging me to fix
it, and then won't do what I suggest. Argh.
Oh yeah, there's also the little matter of a $2200 hospital bill I can't pay.
I've instructed everyone to carry shovels with them and just bury me on the
side of the road somewhere. It's cheaper. LOLOL.
So anyway....A new thing for me....when I get stressed, I apparently clench my
jaw. Tight. I don't even notice until later when it's sore. Now because of the
past couple of weeks, I have a lovely, temporary case of "lock jaw".
A good thing or a bad thing?
Bad....Kind of hard to eat and all that good stuff.
Good....At least now I can't talk on the phone to the people who are stressing
me out and b/f doesn't have to hear me complain about it! LOLOLOL
I think I'll go put a nice warm compress on my jaw and see what happens...
Ah, when it rains, it pours.....
Rachel T.
Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons
For you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
Reply to
Rachel T.
vj found this in rec.crafts.beads, from snipped-for-privacy@aol.comspamsux (Rachel T.) :
]when I get stressed, I apparently clench my ]jaw. Tight. I don't even notice until later when it's sore.
i do it all the time. it's a VERY hard habit to break, too.
----------- @vicki [SnuggleWench] (Books)
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(Jewelry)
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Bill of Rights - Void where prohibited by Law.Regime Change in 2004 - The life you save may be your own.
Reply to
vj
Open your mouth slightly and let your tongue hang loose behind your teeth, instead of pressing against the roof of your mouth. Remove about 40 IQ points from your face (IOW, go slack), and you can counteract the tension quite a bit.
Be absolutely sure to relax your tongue. When your tongue is relaxed, your jaw will follow suit. It can't help it.
Every time you become aware of clenching, think of yourself as a Neanderthal, and match your physiology to that image.
(This may sound bizarre, but I am not pulling your leg...)
Deirdre
On 08 Aug 2003 00:01:52 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comspamsux (Rachel T.) wrote:
>I think I'll go put a nice warm compress on my jaw and see what happens...
Reply to
Deirdre S.
On 08 Aug 2003 00:01:52 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comspamsux (Rachel T.) wrote:
First, call the hospital and fill out the forms to see if you are able to get a bill reduction due to income to debt ratio. If that doesn't work, call they county you live in and check if they have an assistance plan. Also the state. I didn't realize it, but MO has one! They even have a guy who does nothing but negotiate with hospitals on behalf of people who owe them money to get a reduction in the bill or reduced payments! You may have options..... Barbara Dream Master
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"We've got two lives, one we're given, the other one we make." Mary Chapin Carpenter
Reply to
Barbara Otterson
vj found this in rec.crafts.beads, from snipped-for-privacy@removedreamweaverstudio.com (Barbara Otterson) :
] You may have options.....
and if dealing with the hospital directly doesn't help, try the Salvation Army. they are wonderful people and if they can't help themselves, will know who to refer you to that CAN help.
----------- @vicki [SnuggleWench] (Books)
formatting link
(Jewelry)
formatting link
Bill of Rights - Void where prohibited by Law.Regime Change in 2004 - The life you save may be your own.
Reply to
vj
Ugh Rachel...Really bad!
Constant clenching of the jaw can cause deterioration of the wee pad the rests inbetween your jaw joints...it's called Temporal Mandibular Joint Syndrome. It can caused lockjaw, extreme headaches & backaches, & alot of other 'unpleasant' things. (I know, I've got it!) LOL! It can cause your teeth to shift, then your jaw doesn't line up properly, and, watch out, that's really bad!!! (really really!)
I don't want to cause you undue concern, but you should nip that in the bud if possible, as soon as possible!!!
If it's stress that's causing it, you gotta chill, girlfriend!!! LOL! Some have found help by buying a mouth guard, and wearing it when they realize they are clenching. Do you do it when you are sleeping? Do you grind your teeth? Does your jaw joint crack, or crunch? (None of these things are good either!)
Best of Luck...Be...Mellow!
Janice
Reply to
Janice
Yep. (yippee)
I have one somewhere that I had after I got my braces off. Big 'ol football lookin' thing. I'll have to find it...
Thanks for the offer dear, but the info you provided is plenty! I truthfully had no idea they sold them with the toothpaste.
Rachel T. Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons For you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
Reply to
Rachel T.
Got one (after trying since the bill came in June to talk to a live human) and am in the process of filling it out.
This I will look into. Thanks!
Rachel T. Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons For you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
Reply to
Rachel T.
I looked at their website and it mentioned advocates. In fact, several sites (for local places here) mention advocates. I'm keeping this option wide open.
Rachel T. Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons For you are crunchy and good with ketchup.
Reply to
Rachel T.
I got an interesting education about this out of seeing how an actor I really like and admire, who happens to be sharp as a tack, played a character who -wasn't- sharp as a tack.
He did things with his face that really -did- remove 40 IQ points, and when I went back over a few scenes using Rewind, and studied *how* he did that, I realized it was mainly by loosening his jaw, opening his mouth slightly and letting the muscles around his eyes go slacker than usual.
I don't really mean to suggest that any of us can afford to be less intelligent on purpose :-) -- but sometimes unconsciously thinking about stuff we can't really change winds us up to the point where our mainspring is ready to snap. The habitual jaw-clenching strikes me as being related to that kind of inner state.
Consciously controlling our thoughts is really difficult. But relaxing our muscles is more 'voluntary'. And IME, it is harder to *worry obsessively* about things when our facial muscles aren't tense. The thoughts and the muscle-tension seem to go together. Strangely enough, changing the muscle-tension may also slow down the anxious, unproductive thinking-whirlpool, and give more than our jaw-muscles some much-needed relief...
Deirdre
On 09 Aug 2003 02:26:49 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comspamsux (Rachel T.) wrote:
Reply to
Deirdre S.
Yup. And knowing this is very useful *because* physical things are often easier to pinpoint and *do* on purpose than emotional changes. I can say to myself: "I want my mood to change" and sit and wait for that intention to have an effect on my inner state ... without any effect.
But if I say "Let's see ... how do I hold my body when I feel really good?" and then *do* that ... my mood often follows the physiological changes I make.
The trick is not getting so lost in the mood that it doesn't occur to me that I might be able to change it through awareness and different physical actions.
But sometimes I need to just *live* whatever mood I am in, rather than rejecting it because it isn't entirely comfortable. Sadness over loss. Anger over injustice. Experiencing those things isn't 'bad'. The only time I need to try to change mood, IMO, is when I find myself 'stuck' in something that doesn't shift naturally over time, but has me caught in a feedback loop that won't let go. IME, a mood *will* let go when we've experienced and assimilated what we need to from it.
Deirdre
Reply to
Deirdre S.
There's a book, Constructive Living, by Reynolds, who has a slightly different take. It's for a more long term and more "real" outcome, but also effects mood and such. I suppose I'd describe it as, have your body take the actions to go with the state of mind. Not like act rich and you'll be rich. More like, write Thank You notes and you'll be more thankful, more aware of what you have to be thankful. It has some things similar to "Money and the Meaning if Life" and "Your Money or Your Life", because it leads you to question your values and take action on them. But the book is about attaining mental health and satisfaction, rather than having that question about money in it.
Tina
Reply to
Christina Peterson

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