Sleeves


I am in the process of making a coat after about 5 shirts as my total
sewing experience.
After cutting the two pieces for one sleeve and stitching them
together, everything seemed to be a mirror image in subsequent steps.
When I basted the sleeve into an armhole, it was obviously backwards.
I removed it and basted it into the other armhole and it fit like a
glove.
There is not a word in the instructions about a right or left side
sleeve and luckily I only made one of them to try. I have to now figure
out how I made the first one and do something different on the other
one.
What am I missing?
js
PHOTO OF THE WEEK:
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, Beer, Cheese, Fiber,Gems, Sausage,Silver
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Reply to
jack
If your sleeves fits like a glove, in either armhole, you are to be congratulated!
All you need to do to make the other sleeve is to lay the pattern piece(s) down differently. If the sleeve you've just made was cut out with the pattern right side up, cut the other one with the pattern right side down. Or vice versa.
I think the way most patterns are printed, right side up is intended for the right side of the body. Usually the front of the sleeve cap is marked with one notch, and the back is marked with two notches.
Doreen
Reply to
Doreen
The front AND back of the shirt have either 1 or 2 notches on the pieces in the arm hole area. Just match them up with the 1 or 2 notches on the sleeve. HTH Barbara in FL
. Usually the front of the sleeve cap is
Reply to
Barbara Raper
Thanks. Would be nice if the instructions mentioned this detail.
Happens that I ended up with a left sleeve with the patterns rightside up but I could be confused.
js
Reply to
jack
I don't usually respond to my own postings but it just dawned on my why this has never been problem before.
My shirts have one piece sleeves which are symetrical and are fabrics with both right sides. So it didn't matter how I cut them or which side I sewed them into.
js
Reply to
jack
I've had this happen when I accidentally made the joining seam on the wrong side. if it doesn't fit right in the other sleeve opening, unstitch the sleeve seam and restitch it with the seam allowance to the inside.
Ever made a two piece sleeve with one seam inside and one outside? I have done this to a princess seamed bodice before.
Reply to
Kitty In Somerset, PA
When in doubt about which sleeve is which, you can balance it by holding at the dot at the top of the sleeve. The sleeve will "hang" towards the front.
In a two-piece sleeve, the higher part of the undersleeve goes to the back. You should also mark the (usually) square symbol at the underarm on both the garment and the sleeve to make sure it sews in the right place.
Teri
Reply to
gpjones2938
In article , snipped-for-privacy@schmidling.com of
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uttered>I am in the process of making a coat after about 5 shirts as my total>sewing experience.>
A decent commercial pattern should have notches marked on both the armhole and the sleeve head. The double notch is to the garment back, the single to the front.
Reply to
She who would like to be obeye
I just wanted to thankyou for posting this, I am about to start on a coat having only made shirts and had no idea this was the case! Will defnitely remember the part about the sleeves!
-Kat
Reply to
Miss-G-
Generally pieces of the garment are cut on the double, such as sleeves. When cutting on the doubled cloth you would have cut both right and left sleeve pieces. (Your shirt looks nice)
Sometime you might want to look at this book- Classic Tailoring Techniques : A Construction Guide For Men's Wear /Roberto Cabrera, Patricia Flaherty Meyers And even weave some of that horse hair 'haircloth' by using hair from the manes and tails of horses.
Nice website. When in high school this girl made a wax ring which she incased in something hard leaving to holes to the wax, then she poured silver into one of the holes which melted the wax- how she got the silver ring out of the hard stuff I'm not sure. I guess it is a pewter method.
John
Reply to
A
Dear Jack,
This method is called the "lost wax" method. It makes great, detailed designs, but alas, the wax is the model, and it melts when the silver is poured in. The plaster is broken to get the piece out, so no mold is left.
Teri
Reply to
gpjones2938
Hi Teri,
Do you know of any good books on Lost Wax method?
Been thinking about making a thimble.
John
Reply to
A
Dear John,
I'll bet a past issue of Lapidary Journal, or one of the jewelry magazines would have it. If you want to try the library, look under jewelry smithing or jewelry making.
I know one of my students did this years ago for another class, and I saw the wax before she enclosed it in plaster. It was a very delicate bug. She used bees wax for the model.
Please let us know how it comes out. What a great project!!
Teri
Reply to
gpjones2938
The latest thing is to use real items instead of wax. Things like a leaf or a pine cone or other natural object which will vaporize in the high heat, leaving the mold ready to be filled with molten silver or gold.
Reply to
Pogonip
? ?
?I'll bet a past issue of Lapidary Journal, or one of the jewelry magazines would have it. If you want to try the library, look under jewelry smithing or jewelry making.
?I know one of my students did this years ago for another class, and I saw the wax before she enclosed it in plaster. It was a very delicate bug. She used bees wax for the model.
?Please let us know how it comes out. What a great project!!
Thanks
John
Reply to
A
Your post reminds me of a flannel dress I made once long ago, where I sewed the sleeves on backwards. It took a few times wearing it before I realized that I switches sleeves so they were in backwards!
-Irene
Reply to
Irene Scott

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