Re: Box Elder

Hi Ralph,
Every piece of box elder I have turned has eventually faded, usually after
about 2 years. I do know one turner who claims it keeps its color it its
winter cut and finished with polyurethane but can't prove or disprove that.
I've heard of some tracing over the red areas with red ink but I don't know
how natural that looks. Hard to reproduce the different shades of red.
Tony Manella

> At the Pasadena Symposium I attended a session of Binh Pho where he stated
> that the red flame will eventually turn to brown or gray. I recently
> purchased some box elder with beautiful flame color thinking it was
> permanent, especially if kept out of a sunny area. Does anyone have
> differing information or is Binh correct? Gray or brown doesn't sound very
> exciting. If the answer is yes, I must advise customers making box elder
> bowl purchases of this change. This will probably cause some loss of sales
> but that is the way it goes. Anyone with input on this subject please
> respond. Thank you........ Ralph
>
>
Reply to
Tony Manella
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Thanks Tony,
I guess I will have to tell customers that the color will eventually fade. Is the faded color attractive or icky? .......Ralph
Reply to
Ralph J. Ramirez
bin pho, at his demo last week explained that he would airbrush a particular red color over the natural color, following the lines carefully, and then it would not fade
Reply to
william_b_noble
I remember that statement. I may try that on an ugly piece that I don't mind ruining because I am no expert with the airbrush. I do know it has to be done when it is first completed which I believe is when it is still green, that sound about right? Not sure I fully understand the process and failed to ask him when I had the chance (not too smart of me).
Thanks Bill......Ralph
Reply to
Ralph J. Ramirez
It does fade but not nearly as quickly as the other UV reactive woods like purpleheart or osage orange. It fades to a duller "brick brown" to my eyes but takes quite a while to do it and it still looks good anyway.
You can slow down the process of the color fade by using a finish with UV inhibitors such as some autobody lacquers and a few woodworking polyurethanes. Sunblock (such as you would use on your skin) does NOT work though and, in fact, makes the wood much much darker faster.
I'm keeping my pallets of flame box elder in a semi dark area of a shed to dry. It doesn't matter, I suppose, because the outter layers will just get turned away exposing the "fresh" color of flame but it makes me feel better and keeps it out of sight (out of mind!) a bit better.
- Andrew
Reply to
AHilton
Andrew,
Thanks for your valuable input (I'll check into using some type of UV blocker/inhibitor).. I will pass along to my customers what you have told me. Honesty up front is the best way to keep customers happy and coming back.
Thanks again.........Ralph
Reply to
Ralph J. Ramirez
In article , snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...
I know that I couldn't.
Bill
> > > failed to ask him when I had the chance (not too smart of me). > > > > > > Thanks Bill......Ralph
> > > > bin pho, at his demo last week explained that he would airbrush a > > > particular > > > > red color over the natural color, following the lines carefully, and > then > > > it > > > > would not fade > > > > > > > >
> > > > > Thanks Tony, > > > > > > > > > > I guess I will have to tell customers that the color will eventually > > > fade. > > > > > Is the faded color attractive or icky? .......Ralph
> > > > > > Hi Ralph, > > > > > > Every piece of box elder I have turned has eventually faded, > usually > > > > after > > > > > > about 2 years. I do know one turner who claims it keeps its color
Reply to
Bill Rubenstein

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