Featherweight Greasing


It is embarrassing to confess, but I have been woefully negligent in care
and maintenance of my Featherweight (aka Isaac) and it started squeaking! I
added a bit of oil, then DH took it apart to do a proper clean up and
oiling. It works smoother and quieter now, yet one task needs doing.
The manual for FW 221 indicates that one should add Singer Motor Lubricant
to the grease tubes on motor. I don't have any on hand. Do I need that
particular brand or is there a common product that would work as well?
I know we have several quilters who are vintage SM savvy, so I eagerly await
your advice. Thanks in advance.
Pat in Virginia

Reply to
Pat in Virginia
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Shame on you, Pat. SHAME ! The very notion of neglecting a Featherweight is appalling. Don't you ever do that again. Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
There are a couple of FW's here that probably are sort of neglected. Mostly in that they are not used enough. Singer lubricant is what Pat needs. It comes in a white with red writing on the tube. Probably in a blister pack on the notions wall at Joann's. Walmart used to sell it but don't think they do any more. Taria
Reply to
Taria
I use the Singer brand; I'm just afraid of what anything else might do.....turn to gunk, maybe? I just got my FW out, as I had to take my other machine in for repairs. I love to piece on the FW, but I sure miss the knee lift. I have gotten so used to that and the needle up and down!
Reply to
Alice in PA
I have a Featherweight and a Singer 99K, both with full attachments and manuals, and they both work beautifully! I follow all of the maintenance instructions to the letter, and only use Singer brand oil, etc. I think it's well worth the small investment of time and effort.
My current sewing machine issue is that I now have my grandmother's White treadle, which sat covered up with an old bedspread in my mother's basement for over 35 years. I know I'm telling my age, but it's the machine Grandma taught me to sew on when I was in grade school. Fortunately, the original manual was rolled up and stuck in a drawer, and with lots of time and patience I was able to get it flattened out and copied. The machine, of course, had not been oiled for at least 35 years, so over the course of two months I oiled it, and have been able to get the parts un-jammed and beginning to move again. It took repeated oilings, of course. I am hopeful that I can get it really working nicely again. (The bobbin is working beautifully now!) The next problem is getting needles that fit. The one in the machine is almost twice as long as the ones I can find for sale these days. However, there is a Singer shop in town that has parts for Singers of all ages, so I am hoping they can look at the needle I have and find something that will work. If all else fails, I will have to clean up and sharpen the needle I have.
Reply to
Mary
As soon as I get rid of this flu or whatever, I will check out Joanne. There is a Singer store near there, convenient in case JF does not have the product. I hope Polly doesn't read about your neglect, Taria!! Thanks, Pat
Reply to
Pat in Virginia
Too late, Pat. I saw Taria's confession but I was cutting her a little slack since her DH has been terrifying her with assorted ER visits. See? There are a few excuses for neglecting SMs. Very few. Don't push. As to flu recovery, I highly recommend a visit to the Swamp. The skies are clear, the temp is about 75° and the gators are all preening and grooming for their Spring Break ritual a/k/a "take a tourist to dinner". Polly
"Pat in Virginia" <
Reply to
Polly Esther
Is it a White Family Rotary? If it is, it takes the same 15x1 needles that modern machines use. The older White VS (vibrating shuttle) machines use the 20x1 needle, that is still in production, although in limited sizes. Size 14 will be the easiest to obtain, but I think 12s and 16s are still available as well.
Try putting a regular needle in the needle clamp, and see if it will pick up the thread. Bear in mind that the White Rotary handwheel turns "backward" from the forward motion of Singers. HTH.
Maria in NE PA
Reply to
Maria O
Thanks Polly. I appreciate that kindness. Things seem to be sort of getting back to some sense of 'normal' here. I don't wish to have such excuses in the future. Weather beautiful here lately too. It is a joy to sit out in the sunshine and watch the pups and birds enjoying the yard. Taria
Reply to
Taria
And for at least some of the White vibrating shuttle machines that take the 20x1 needle, they will work with regular needles if you cheat them down in the needle clamp half a hair.
I've got a 1886 White VS treadle that is one of my favorite machines to use.
Dragonfly
Reply to
Dragonfly
have no idea but thought I'd pop by with a chorus of my husband's favourite song while servicing my machines
Please regrease me...let me sew!
Reply to
Kim Graham
I love it too! Wonder if our Va Pat could get her fife corps to belt that tune out? Polly
"Louise in Iowa" Love it! Does he sound anything like Englebert Humperdinck (or Jim
Reply to
Polly Esther
Puhleese Miss Polly! The Original Virginia Fife and Drum Corps* does NOT 'belt it out' for any tune. The Corps* is a very talented and sophisticated musical organization. Today the songs of choice are 'Danny Boy', 'Irish Eyes', 'It's a long way to Tipperary' and other music to celebrate MY name day! * Kindly note that Corps is pronounced Core, not Corpse, and Corpsman is pronounced Core-man, not Corpse-man, despite a certain someone who should know better!!! Now I will step off my soap box and wish you ....
Happy St. Pat's Day from Pat in Virginia
Reply to
Pat in Virginia
On the other hand.....when someone stacks their instruments ready to be packed for a road trip....and someone else backs over them....
THEN you have the fife and drum corpse(s)!
--pig, ducking
On 3/17/10 10:24 AM, in article tu6on.37070$ snipped-for-privacy@newsfe07.iad, "Pat in
Reply to
Megan Zurawicz

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