Oneway remote switch problems

Hi,
Anybody ever have any problems with the (add-on) remote switch for the
Oneway lathe? Mine is starting to fail. Was wondering if they've been
able to get replacement switches at a local electronic place.
And...yeah...before anybody suggestes it, I'm putting a call into Oneway
in the morning. But hoping I can find the switches locally...both for
speed and because Oneway seems to add a healthy mark-up.
thanks,
randy
Reply to
randy Rhine
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Yeah...did that a couple of times...but it's failing nore & more often. I'm thinking that maybe the contacts in the switch(s) are getting worn. I do a lot of boxes & things that require fitting...so...it gets used quite a bit...lotta start/stop.
In any case, shoulda contacted Oneway first. They're shipping new switches at no cost. Great lathes...class company.
Thanks,
randy
Reply to
Nobody
"Nobody" wrote in message
Problem solved, obviously. But you might try shooting some WD-40 onto the contacts of the other switch. Works nicely with most types of contacts, including those carrying RF energy.
Max
Reply to
Maxprop
Works nicely with most types of contacts, including those carrying RF energy.<
BAD IDEA! WD-40 is flammable. Try DE-OXIT for cleaning electrical contacts. That's what it's made for.
Reply to
W2ZR
BAD IDEA! WD-40 is flammable. Try DE-OXIT for cleaning electrical contacts. That's what it's made for. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Not THAT bad! I don't think Maxprop meant to operate the switch under load while spraying. Afew seconds after spraying, 99% of the volatiles are gone, (based on virtual tests conducted in my imagination ). Most of us have WD-40 within easy reach--How many have De-oxit?
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
BAD IDEA! WD-40 is flammable. Try DE-OXIT for cleaning
As a side note, I'd be concerned about the possibility of the "protective" film left by WD40 attracting and holding dust.
Reply to
James Barley
"W2ZR" wrote in message
It appears to be flammable only when atomized. I've attempted to ignite a small reservoir of the stuff, without success.
Max
Reply to
Maxprop
"W2ZR" wrote in message
That was my question when someone recommended it to me years ago. It does, apparently, or at the very least does nothing to impede the flow of electrons. In fact it's recommended for use in electrical and RF connections by those who manufacture them. I've used it for a great many such applications, including 2M mobile antenna connections (base to whip) and all SO-239s, BNCs and N-type connectors.
Max
Reply to
Maxprop
Would you happen to know the vapor pressure and the flash point of the distillates?
Road tar is a petroleum distillate, so is gasoline.
Reply to
George
"W2ZR" wrote in message
A can of WD-40 makes a wonderful blow torch to impress the neighborhood kids, thanks to volatile, flammable substances contained therein. But as an ultrathin flim it's as likely to ignite as is crude oil. Kerosene is also a petroleum distillate, and I can immerse a lit match in it without igniting it. The WD in WD-40 implies 'water displacement.' Water is the enemy of any electrical or RF contact. It inhibits the conduction of electrons unless loaded with electrolytic ions, and causes corrosion. Since using WD-40 in my transmission line and antenna connectors, I've blown no more finals due to high SWR. Miracle stuff, really.
Max
Reply to
Maxprop

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