manual wheels?

What is your opinion on using foot-powered wheels? I learned on one and
have been using an electric wheel since moving to my new studio. I kind of
miss the manual one, there was a real tempo you could get into. What do you
think?
Reply to
Hana Rednib
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I like the quiet rhythm of a treadle wheel and always have. I feel like an appendage to an electric one. My treadle is part of me.
Steve Bath UK
In article , Hana Rednib writes
Reply to
Steve Mills
they are useful as a second wheel. they force you to make every touch count. with an electric you can get lazy & sloppy. you can't do that kickers.
steve
steve graber
Reply to
Slgraber
For the hobbyist, kick wheels are great. For a professional, it's kind of like hand saws versus power saws for carpenters--they both do the work, but one does the work 10 times quicker... I learned on a kick wheel, was forced to an electric when apprenticing and they didn't have room for another kick wheel, and after a while found I was throwing pots faster (no, not better) than my master potters.
Brad Sondahl
-- For original art, music, pottery, and literature, visit my homepage
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Reply to
Brad Sondahl
I like my kick wheel, it's always going at the right speed, while my power wheel (tho' wonderful for big ware) seems to always be just @ the wrong speed so that i'm either hurrying to catch it up or waiting for it.... Like Steve says i feel like an appendage with the power wheel... Hugs Guys, It's good to be back...
> For the hobbyist, kick wheels are great. For a professional, it's kind of like > hand saws versus power saws for carpenters--they both do the work, but one does > the work 10 times quicker... I learned on a kick wheel, was forced to an > electric when apprenticing and they didn't have room for another kick wheel, and > after a while found I was throwing pots faster (no, not better) than my master > potters. > > Brad Sondahl > > -- > For original art, music, pottery, and literature, visit my homepage >
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> > To reply to me directly, don't forget to take out the "garbage" from my address. > > > > > >
Reply to
Eddie Daughton
Hi Brad,
Actually, here in Japan, the best carpenters and cabinet makers still use hand tools and their work is much finer than we find typically in the USA.
Power tool does not necessarily mean faster. Nor does it mean better. While I fire with a wood kiln, my korean keiyaki kick wheel is actually more important to me than my wood kiln. Many potters who studying with my teacher, Tatsuzo Shimaoka, use Korean Kickwheels. As so do Randy Johnston and Willem Gebben.
As someone who came to pottery from Zen Buddhism, I can tell you that the low momentum kickwheel is much more meditative. It can be similar to zen meditation, if you pay attention to your breath.
Also, I find that I can throw all day on the korean kickwheel with no leg or back pain. I cannot say the same for my throwing on my shimpo gold electric, back in St. Paul, MN. I think the leg movement helps both the legs and the back. The traditional throwing platform, soft clay and throwing off the hump is also conducive to good posture.
If you check out this link you can see a wheel something like mine:
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Reply to
Lee Love
Hi Brad,
Actually, here in Japan, the best carpenters and cabinet makers still use hand tools and their work is much finer than we find typically in the USA.
Power tool does not necessarily mean faster. Nor does it mean better. While I fire with a wood kiln, my korean keiyaki kick wheel is actually more important to me than my wood kiln. Many potters who studying with my teacher, Tatsuzo Shimaoka, use Korean Kickwheels. As so do Randy Johnston and Willem Gebben.
As someone who came to pottery from Zen Buddhism, I can tell you that the low momentum kickwheel is much more meditative. It can be similar to zen meditation, if you pay attention to your breath.
Also, I find that I can throw all day on the korean kickwheel with no leg or back pain. I cannot say the same for my throwing on my shimpo gold electric, back in St. Paul, MN. I think the leg movement helps both the legs and the back. The traditional throwing platform, soft clay and throwing off the hump is also conducive to good posture.
If you check out this link you can see a wheel something like mine:
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Reply to
Lee Love
Lee Love writes:
Indeed, I like to do a lot of my trimming on the kickwheel, it's generally relaxing. That, and kickwheels don't do anything unexpected that electric can (like accelerate rapidly)
Myself, I only throw on it as a last resort, since my bad right knee doesn't like the motion, and it's rather late for me to learn to spin the wheel clockwise...
Reply to
Richard Kaszeta
I worked on a kick wheel (Lockerbee) for the first 10 years that I made pottery professionally. Most of what I throw is small forms that are under 8 lbs of clay. I threw 30 lbs off the hump regularly with this kick wheel. An accident in 1980 to my knee and ankle left me with enough weakness that I electrified the kick wheel. I have used Brent and Shimpo wheels when demonstrating. I find the combination kick and electric the best solution for my needs. I think that learning on a kick wheel gives the potter a more subtle hand.. though I tend to throw rather chunky any how... Russ Andavall
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Reply to
Russell Andavall
Hi Richard,
You might find the Korean kickwheels "possible." Actually, "kickwheel is a misnomer, because you actually pull with them. I throw counter-clockwise and I pull the wheel with a bare left foot.
Reply to
Lee Love

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