SM needles

I was reading about stretch needles on another quilting group and the
msgs were quite interesting.
if you are having problems with skipped stitches, thread breaking or
shreading then the stretch needle is the one to use.
Have any of you that do free motion use the stretch needles
exclusively for quilting.
Kate T. South Mississippi
Reply to
Kate T.
Loading thread data ...
Never bought any, because I thought they had rounded tips (not sharp) for use with knit fabrics. Is this not the case? Wouldn't they have trouble penetrating a quilt sandwich? Roberta in D
Reply to
Roberta
Interesting idea, Kate. The SMs here are quite happy with just ordinary green-band quilting needles by Schmetz. There are some stretch needles here but I don't even remember what they're for. Polly
"Kate T." I was reading about stretch needles on another quilting group and the
Reply to
Polly Esther
Miss Polly: Maybe, in the interest of Quilting Science, you could put together a tiny quilt sandwich for the purpose of experimenting with those needles. Do be sure to report back to Quilting Central! PAT, enjoying Spring in Virginia
Reply to
Pat in Virginia
That's what I thought, too. One of the reasons a quilting needle or a denim needle is recommended for quilting is that they have sharp tips. A universal needle is sharper than a ball point needle or a stretch needle, but still not quite as sharp a point as quilting and denim needles. Stretch needles and ball point needles are used for sewing knits because they are not supposed to penetrate the thread, but slip between the threads; stretch needles are often used for sewing tight knits like Lycra because they are less likely to skip stitches on those types of fabric.
Julia in MN
Reply to
Julia in MN
Nay, Pat. I belong to the 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' clan. This morning's problem is much greater. I have a crib quilt top almost done. It needs a border - but! - it's a crazy quilt of blocks stitched to a muslin foundation. If I put a border on, the border is going to be much thinner than the blocks. I'm probably going to double the border. We will hope that if I press carefully, I can double it without a stretch or ripple. Film at eleven. Polly
"Pat in Virginia" Miss Polly: Maybe, in the interest of Quilting Science, you could put
Reply to
Polly Esther
I think I made about a zillion t-shirts when the kids were little and used them. I kep them around but don't recall using them to quilt. Not bad to have another option when a quilt gets fussy though. I wonder if SUnny tried those when she was having trouble with her thread/machine last week? Taria
Reply to
Taria
You can sew a border on with the batting inside. Let's see if I can describe it. Picture this layering. Lay your quilt with right side up. Lay your new border backing strip UNDER your quilt with Right Sides Together. Lay your top border strip on the quilt RRT. Then lay your batting strip on top of that. Sew the seam then flip and press everything outward. It's a type of "quilt as you go" technique. Let me know if I didn't describe this correctly. When you sew the layers should be...from bottom up...border backing, quilt, border fabric and lastly, batt.
Reply to
KJ
And on the Tin Lizzie list it was mentioned that using a ball point/ stretch needle could be a cause of bearding on the back. The rounded point can get caught in the batting and force a bit through to the other side. I wouldn't recommend a ball point/stretch needle for anything but knits. That is what they were designed for, to prevent breaking yarns in the knit which can create "runs" in the fabric. If you are having those kind of problems, the first thing to check is the thread. If it is good quality, not slubby, and not old and brittle, try a topstitch needle. (there is great info on trouble shooting on the Superior Threads website, in the "Education" section.)
Pati, in Phx
Reply to
Pati, in Phx
Thanks for the update on this, Pati. Do you own a Tin Lizzie now? I've been eyeing those but there is just no way I could add one to my house. I am still keeping my eyes out for something with a smaller footprint. PAT in VA/USA
And on the Tin Lizzie list it was mentioned that using a ball point/ stretch needle could be a cause of bearding on the back. The rounded point can get caught in the batting and force a bit through to the other side. I wouldn't recommend a ball point/stretch needle for anything but knits. That is what they were designed for, to prevent breaking yarns in the knit which can create "runs" in the fabric. If you are having those kind of problems, the first thing to check is the thread. If it is good quality, not slubby, and not old and brittle, try a topstitch needle. (there is great info on trouble shooting on the Superior Threads website, in the "Education" section.)
Reply to
Pat in Virginia
Thank you, Kathyl, but not this time - you see it's a crib quilt and I was trying to get an even thickness without adding much weight. The quilt blocks already are too heavy to allow a batting. I simply doubled the border and backed it with flannel. That went well. Now, I'm just going to tie it; probably with something really cute such as hearts or bows. Polly
Reply to
Polly Esther
I've almost finished two crazy quilts this week - one is just plain crazy and the other is strings on the diagonal. With all the seams and the foundation, they're a little heavier than I'm used to. Polly
"KJ" Ah....I see. I didn't quite understand your problem. I have no doubt you
Reply to
Polly Esther
Pat, I have a Lizzie, but it isn't yet set up. Need to finish clearing out the front room, take up the carpet that got soaked again and set it up. Stuff keeps interfering with getting it done. sigh. You can set the Lizzie up at whatever size you want. Since I have limited space, and won't do huge quilts on it, I am planning to use about 8' poles for mine. (standard length of the conduit you need for the poles is 10', and a lot of shops set them up at 5' for demo purposes.) You do need a bit of room on each end to get around and to loosen knobs and such, but not a whole lot. Many people put casters or sliders on the bottom of the legs and move the whole set up back against a wall when not in use. Lots of options.
I really want mine set up. And have many plans for it.
Pati, in Phx
Reply to
Pati, in Phx
I went to the quilt show in Somerset, NJ this weekend and really liked the Tin Lizzy. They had quite a show sale going on but I'm not quite ready to buy. Can you tell me which model you have? There was a vast difference in the one that starts automatically from the one that doesn't and I don't know if that's a good thing or not.
AliceW in NJ
Reply to
AliceW
I bet there is a Yahoo group for tin lizzy user or those interested in them. Might be worth checking and following. I know you send your quilts out ALice. You can quilt them. I just know you can. Just think of all the money you would save if you did them yourself? I just think you need to jump right in. Go for it! Taria
Reply to
Taria
Taria, I'm thinking the same thing. I don't have the extra funds right now to pay someone to quilt my quilts now that a new grandbaby is on the way and gas prices are rising again. My DH did get me a gift certificate for a local quilt shop for lessons on their long arm. I can then rent it for $15 per hour. I think this is a good first start. We're looking at retirement in 2-3 years which is when the long arm purchase will happen. Then I can get the one I want with all the bells and whistles I want as well!
Reply to
AliceW
You might be in trouble when you start thinking like me! LOL I think the lessons are a great start. Sometimes the planning and thinking of bells and whistles is fun in and of itself. I don't think I said congrats on the new grandbaby. I can't believe how fast time flies. I am so happy for your dd. You have lots of fun ahead of you. I am jealous. Taria
Reply to
Taria
Yes there is a Yahoo group for the Lizzie. Great group of people, and lots of information. At least one of the techs at the "home office" monitors the group too, and will answer questions and so forth.
I have to confess.... I am not positive which Lizzie I have... it is still in the box and was delivered in the middle of a switch to a newer model. But I will love which ever it is, I know. I fell in love with the Tin Lizzie the very first time I saw it at a show. When it was brand new and just beginning to be sold.
Pati, in Phx
Reply to
Pati, in Phx
On Sat, 7 Mar 2009 02:58:15 -0500, Kate T. wrote (in article ):
Stretch needles. No. I'm surprised they worked since they're for knits.
Maureen
P.S. They are really hard to find around here.
Reply to
Maureen Wozniak

Site Timeline Threads

InspirePoint website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.